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Saxby Feb15-13 07:37 AM

The specific heat capacity of solids
 
Why is the specific heat capacity of most solids around 25JK-1mol-1?

I remember being told ages ago that is was something to do with the theory of equipartition but i'm not really sure how that theory affects it or why it's around 25JK-1mol-1

ZapperZ Feb15-13 08:45 AM

Re: The specific heat capacity of solids
 
Quote:

Quote by Saxby (Post 4270928)
Why is the specific heat capacity of most solids around 25JK-1mol-1?

I remember being told ages ago that is was something to do with the theory of equipartition but i'm not really sure how that theory affects it or why it's around 25JK-1mol-1

Are you sure?

Here is a list of specific heats of some of the most common solids:

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/sp...ids-d_154.html

Compare some of the common stuff - glass window and copper. One is about twice the other. That's a 100% difference! And scanning through the list, I don't see this trend of them being "most" around the number you cited.

Zz.

Jorriss Feb15-13 12:21 PM

Re: The specific heat capacity of solids
 
The classical limit of a crystals heat capacity is 3R per mole. It's called the Dulong-Petit Law if you'd like to read about it.


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