View Single Post
WhyIsItSo
#22
Aug20-06, 05:12 PM
P: 185
Quote Quote by Farsight
This supports the observations of those who wrote during WW2, that after a heavy battle, a number of bullets were found slightly embedded in tar rooftops, all pointed towards the sky.[/i]
Interesting. If a bullet fired vertically does not change attitude througout its flight, therefore falls back "butt-first", its drag would be pretty high. Assuming 0.6...

BTW, I just realised I was taking a .45 as 300 grams NOT grains as I should have. Correcting that now....

Plug that into my "formula" gives a terminal velocity of 69m/s = 226ft/s = 154mph.

A 30.06 will have different characteristics. The largest my research tells me is 220 grains. Plugging the relevant numbers in...

79m/s = 259ft/s = 177mph.

For 150 grain bullet...

65m/s = 213ft/s = 145mph.

If one takes the drag coefficient to be 0.3...

92m/s = 302ft/s = 206mph.

It would seem to be a little low for drag for a flat surface, but that is what it takes to get about 300ft/s terminal velocity for a 150 grain 30.06 bullet falling butt-first!

Guess my numbers are wrong. The part I'm not sure of is the drag coefficient. Oh well...