View Single Post
andytoh
#1
Nov17-07, 05:10 PM
P: 363
I am reading "The linear algebra a beginning graduate student ought to know" by Golan, and I encountered a puzzling statement:

Let V be a vector space (not necessarily finitely generated) over a field F. Prove that there exists a bijective function between any two bases of V. Hint: Use transfinite induction.

If V is generated by a finite set (with n elements), then I know how to prove that any basis has at most n elements, and thus all bases will have the same number of elements. But for infinite-dimensional vector spaces, I'm confused. How do I use transfinite induction to prove that there is a bijective correspondence between two bases of V if V is infinite-dimensional?
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Scientists develop 'electronic nose' for rapid detection of C. diff infection
Why plants in the office make us more productive
Tesla Motors dealing as states play factory poker