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lion8172
#1
Dec14-07, 10:16 PM
P: 30
In the chapter on radiation (Chapter 11), Griffiths notes that an electric monopole does not radiate, but also that a point charge of electric dipole moment [tex]\mathbf{p} (t) = q \mathbf{d} (t) [/tex] (where [tex] \mathbf{d} (t) [/tex] is the instantaneous coordinate of the charge with respect to a fixed origin ) radiates with power
[tex] P = \mu_0 q^2 a^2/(6 \pi c) [/tex], where [tex] \mathbf{a}(t) = \ddot{\mathbf{p}} (t) [/tex]. By "monopole," does he simply mean a point charge that doesn't move?
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