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klqc_
#1
Feb4-12, 07:17 PM
P: 2
Suppose the following

X is not necessarily not Y.
If X is Y then X necessarily cannot be Z.
Does that mean X cannot be Z?

I probably screwed up stating that...

To clarify
The first line is meant to be a solipsistic statement - I may be all there is.
The second line is meant to state that if I am all there is then I cannot imagine being annihilated.
In the third line I conclude that I cannot imagine my annihilation.


I'm not concluding that we must "live" forever in oblivion but it's kinda the idea.
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