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Arham
#1
Nov14-12, 07:37 AM
P: 26
Hi

We can derive equation [itex]\nabla.D=\rho_f[/itex] from equation [itex]\nabla.E=\rho/\epsilon_0[/itex]. But what about Ampere's law? I tried to derive [itex]\nabla\times{H}=J_f+\partial{D}/\partial{t}[/itex] from [itex]\nabla\times{B}=\mu_0J+\epsilon_0\mu_0\partial{E}/\partial{t}[/itex] but I could not. This is strange because I thought that Maxwell's equations in vacuum are enough for studying electromagnetic field in any matter and that Maxwell's equations in matter are derivable from them.
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