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MarkoniF
MarkoniF is offline
#1
Dec14-12, 01:14 AM
P: 56
Relative motion between a permanent magnet and a conductor wire produces electric current in the wire. Would induced electric current be greater in a wire made of "magnetic" material like iron, "non-magnetic" material like copper, or it doesn't matter? In other words, is there relation between material magnetic properties and its inductivity? And similar but I think different question, is there relation between material magnetic properties and its conductivity?

How come magnetic field of a permanent magnet can interact with magnetic fields inside a wire that is overall magnetically neutral? Does the same thing happen with electric fields, so if instead of permanent magnet we had some electrically charged object, could we also induce electric current in a conductor wire by their relative motion?
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