Does your brain outpower a computer?


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mplayer
mplayer is offline
#37
Jan31-09, 01:14 PM
P: 154
Perhaps life is programmed to preserve itself. Programmed is probably not the best word to use here, because it implies some consciously coded set of instructions to carry out. Whether or not life was consciously 'coded' is debatable, but in my opinion seems highly unlikely. Life is adapted to preserve itself.

An organism's genome could be analogous to a program. Genetic information within our genome consisting of DNA contains the instructions necessary for building our bodies, including our brains. Our bodies are vehicles built by genes for the purpose of perpetuating those genes, even to the detriment of the individual organism itself. Using the word program does not take away any meaning or special quality from life. It does not take away it's essence, whatever that is.

Life itself could be compared to an amazingly complex set of programmed instructions. The fact that we do not yet have the knowledge or methods to understand it fully does not necessarily mean that life has some sort of magical quality that is absolutely superior to our fairly limited computational devices.
Averagesupernova
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#38
Jan31-09, 06:21 PM
P: 2,451
Quote Quote by mplayer View Post
Perhaps life is programmed to preserve itself. Programmed is probably not the best word to use here, because it implies some consciously coded set of instructions to carry out. Whether or not life was consciously 'coded' is debatable, but in my opinion seems highly unlikely. Life is adapted to preserve itself.

An organism's genome could be analogous to a program. Genetic information within our genome consisting of DNA contains the instructions necessary for building our bodies, including our brains. Our bodies are vehicles built by genes for the purpose of perpetuating those genes, even to the detriment of the individual organism itself. Using the word program does not take away any meaning or special quality from life. It does not take away it's essence, whatever that is.

Life itself could be compared to an amazingly complex set of programmed instructions. The fact that we do not yet have the knowledge or methods to understand it fully does not necessarily mean that life has some sort of magical quality that is absolutely superior to our fairly limited computational devices.
I agree with this post more than virtually anything ever posted here on PF.
N468989
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#39
Jan31-09, 06:55 PM
P: 82
"Does your brain outpower a computer?"

The answer is: Yes and No. Or if you like, we can say it depends.

It depends on what we are considering. If some situations computers outpower humans, or else we wouldn't need computers for fast and accurate calculations, processing of information, etc. There are other situations where computers cannot react or interact with new situations, from this point of view humans win.

In a distant future, i believe computers will outpower humans in over 90%, lets just look at the fact that we are limited physically and mentally. One of the uniqueness of us is the fact that we have something called conscious. Just that itself outpowers any imaginable computer system.
Hurkyl
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#40
Jan31-09, 07:06 PM
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Quote Quote by N468989 View Post
One of the uniqueness of us is the fact that we have something called conscious. Just that itself outpowers any imaginable computer system.
Can you define "consciousness"? How do you know we have it? How do you know a computer doesn't? What about dolphins, or dogs?

What concrete, observational experiment can be used to determine what does and does not have consciousness?
N468989
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#41
Jan31-09, 07:43 PM
P: 82
Quote Quote by Hurkyl View Post
Can you define "consciousness"? How do you know we have it? How do you know a computer doesn't? What about dolphins, or dogs?

What concrete, observational experiment can be used to determine what does and does not have consciousness?
I cannot define consciousness as we define other things, there is much more to it than a dictionary definition. From the definition point of view, we know we have it because we can change the state of consciousness through hypnosis, sleep, etc( if we change something in any matter, we know it exists). We can define it being something immaterial, but that would bring us to philosophical and religious complications. It's not something universally accepted by all.
Hurkyl
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#42
Jan31-09, 08:02 PM
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My intent wasn't to challenge you to solve a long-standing philosophical problem -- it was more just to come up with something that can be observed and supports your argument. You effectively claimed three things:

Humans have consciousness.
Computers do not (and cannot) have consciousness.
Consciousness involves a huge amount of 'computing' power.

from which you conclude that the human brain outpowers any imaginable computer. I don't really care if you can come up with a generally accepted definition of 'consciousness' -- I just want a definition that satisfies your three claims!
Scorael
Scorael is offline
#43
Feb1-09, 02:08 AM
P: 5
In my humble opinion, computers have yet reached the level of intelligence as humans because so far only humans (and perhaps animals) have the ability to be curious. We wonder why the sky is blue, why it hurts when we fall, etc. While current computers can learn it cannot wonder.

By the way, I am pretty paranoid about the artificial lifeforms taking over the world thing lol. They better place a virus into every single robot just in case.
aquitaine
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#44
Feb1-09, 10:10 AM
P: 201
Recently there was something of a breakthrough regarding this

Logic circuits that program themselves: memristors in action

Integrated circuits incorporating memristors are able to successfully perform logic operations and dynamically reprogram themselves, opening the door for learning devices.

Since 1972, scientists have known there are four basic circuit components, but if you've spent any time in an electrical engineering classroom, you probably only have experience with three: capacitor, inductor, and resistor. The fourth basic component, the memristor, had remained stuck in the domain of theory--a nice idea that even the theorists thought had few practical uses. Last year, scientists at Hewlett-Packard (HP) demonstrated the first functional solid-state memristor, made from thin films of TiO2, and discovered it had an abundance of unique and highly promising properties.

A study released Monday by The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that these same TiO2 memristors can be fabricated into functional and reprogrammable integrated circuits. Scientists at HP combined a crossbar architecture of memristors with field effect transistors (FETs) to produce a convincing proof-of-concept device that includes circuits that can dynamically reprogram themselves, acting a bit like a solid-state nerve cell-like operation--a holy grail of electrical engineering.
All we needed were memristors to make this happen.
XPTPCREWX
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#45
Feb1-09, 11:33 AM
P: 97
Quote Quote by mplayer View Post
Perhaps life is programmed to preserve itself. Programmed is probably not the best word to use here, because it implies some consciously coded set of instructions to carry out. Whether or not life was consciously 'coded' is debatable, but in my opinion seems highly unlikely. Life is adapted to preserve itself.

An organism's genome could be analogous to a program. Genetic information within our genome consisting of DNA contains the instructions necessary for building our bodies, including our brains. Our bodies are vehicles built by genes for the purpose of perpetuating those genes, even to the detriment of the individual organism itself. Using the word program does not take away any meaning or special quality from life. It does not take away it's essence, whatever that is.

Life itself could be compared to an amazingly complex set of programmed instructions. The fact that we do not yet have the knowledge or methods to understand it fully does not necessarily mean that life has some sort of magical quality that is absolutely superior to our fairly limited computational devices.
Guys seriously.......Do you think a computer could ever come up with this conversation?


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