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Number of Solutions to d(p)

by flouran
Tags: cardinality, primes, solutions
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flouran
#1
Aug29-09, 12:40 PM
P: 64
What is the number of solutions d(p) of
[tex]N-n^2 \equiv 0 \pmod p[/tex]

where p is a prime and n and N are positive and N => n?
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JustSam
#2
Aug29-09, 01:37 PM
P: 21
I'm not sure what you are really asking, but for each prime p, there are an infinite number of solutions (N,n) satisfying your criteria. Take n = 1, and N= k*p + 1, for k = 1, 2, 3, ...
flouran
#3
Aug29-09, 01:39 PM
P: 64
Quote Quote by JustSam View Post
I'm not sure what you are really asking, but for each prime p, there are an infinite number of solutions (N,n) satisfying your criteria. Take n = 1, and N= k*p + 1, for k = 1, 2, 3, ...
I have a trivial upper bound for d(p). That is, d(p) < p-1 for [tex]p\nmid N[/tex]. I think that suffices for my usages of d(p) for now.

flouran
#4
Aug29-09, 04:06 PM
P: 64
Number of Solutions to d(p)

I am an idiot.
Hint: quadratic residue
JustSam
#5
Aug29-09, 05:24 PM
P: 21
I still don't understand what you are asking.
Quote Quote by flouran View Post
What is the number of solutions d(p) of
[tex]N-n^2 \equiv 0 \pmod p[/tex]

where p is a prime and n and N are positive and N => n?
Let p be a prime number. Define d(p) as the cardinality of

[tex]$
\{ (N,n) : N \ge 1, n \ge 1, N \ge n, N \equiv n^2 \pmod p \}
[/tex]

Clearly you intend something different.
flouran
#6
Aug29-09, 07:28 PM
P: 64
Quote Quote by JustSam View Post
I still don't understand what you are asking.

Let p be a prime number. Define d(p) as the cardinality of

[tex]$
\{ (N,n) : N \ge 1, n \ge 1, N \ge n, N \equiv n^2 \pmod p \}
[/tex]

Clearly you intend something different.
I can be clearer:
Let F(n) be a polynomial of degree g => 1 with integer coefficients. Let d(p) denote the number of solutions to the congruency [tex]F(n) \equiv 0 \pmod p[/tex] for all primes p (and suppose that d(p) < p for all p). We may take F(n) = N-n^2, where N is an integer greater than (or equal to) n. What is d(p) then in this case?
JustSam
#7
Aug29-09, 07:46 PM
P: 21
Quote Quote by flouran View Post
I can be clearer:
Let F(n) be a polynomial of degree g => 1 with integer coefficients. Let d(p) denote the number of solutions to the congruency [tex]F(n) \equiv 0 \pmod p[/tex] for all primes p (and suppose that d(p) < p for all p). We may take F(n) = N-n^2, where N is an integer greater than (or equal to) n. What is d(p) then in this case?
Let p be a prime number. Define d(p) as:

[tex]$
\max_{N \ge 1} \left| \{ n \pmod p : N \equiv n^2 \pmod p \} \right|
[/tex]

Then d(2) = 1, d(p) = 2 for odd primes p.
srijithju
#8
Aug31-09, 01:46 PM
P: 57
Quote Quote by JustSam View Post
Let p be a prime number. Define d(p) as:

[tex]$
\max_{N \ge 1} \left| \{ n \pmod p : N \equiv n^2 \pmod p \} \right|
[/tex]

Then d(2) = 1, d(p) = 2 for odd primes p.
I dont think this is the right solution . Consider p = 3 and N = 2. We know that no square number is congruent to 2 modulo 3. So in this case d(3) = 0
JustSam
#9
Aug31-09, 01:57 PM
P: 21
Quote Quote by srijithju View Post
I dont think this is the right solution . Consider p = 3 and N = 2. We know that no square number is congruent to 2 modulo 3. So in this case d(3) = 0
Which is why it is important to have a precise definition of d(p). According to my second version, d(p) is the maximum number of solutions over all possible choices for N, so it makes sense that you can find particular values of N that have fewer than d(p) solutions.

Perhaps "d(p,N) = exact number of solutions" would be a more useful function.
srijithju
#10
Aug31-09, 01:59 PM
P: 57
I think you mean that N is fixed , but

If the question is :
Find all N < p such that n^2 = N ( mod p) for some n ( By some n , I mean that corresponding to each N there will be one n) , then :

d(p) = greatest integer less than square root of p
srijithju
#11
Aug31-09, 02:11 PM
P: 57
Quote Quote by JustSam View Post
Which is why it is important to have a precise definition of d(p). According to my second version, d(p) is the maximum number of solutions over all possible choices for N, so it makes sense that you can find particular values of N that have fewer than d(p) solutions.

Perhaps "d(p,N) = exact number of solutions" would be a more useful function.
Considering d(p,N) :

take remainder of N divided by p . Let it be r.
Now if r is a perfect square , then d(p.N) will have infinite solutions of the form r + kp
else there is no solution
flouran
#12
Sep7-09, 06:43 PM
P: 64
Would d(p) be different if it was instead the number of solutions to:
[tex]F(n) \equiv 0 \pmod p[/tex]? Here F(n) = n - q where q = m^2 is a perfect square where m is a natural number.
CRGreathouse
#13
Sep8-09, 04:56 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
P: 3,684
Is m fixed or can it take any integer value? Are there any limits on the value of n or m?
flouran
#14
Sep8-09, 05:43 PM
P: 64
Quote Quote by CRGreathouse View Post
Is m fixed or can it take any integer value? Are there any limits on the value of n or m?
There are no limits on the value of n or m. Nice to see you on the forums, by the way Charles!
CRGreathouse
#15
Sep9-09, 02:07 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
P: 3,684
Quote Quote by flouran View Post
Would d(p) be different if it was instead the number of solutions to:
[tex]F(n) \equiv 0 \pmod p[/tex]? Here F(n) = n - q where q = m^2 is a perfect square where m is a natural number.
Quote Quote by flouran View Post
There are no limits on the value of n or m.
So there are, trivially, infinitely many solutions.

Quote Quote by flouran View Post
Nice to see you on the forums, by the way Charles!
You too.


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