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Magnetic field lines of a moving electron

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QED-Kasper
#1
Mar28-10, 07:10 AM
P: 32
How do the magnetic field lines of a moving electron in a straight line look? What about the magnetic field lines of a rotating hydrogen electron? I mean the magnetic field produced due to the electron's intrinsic spin and due to its movement in a line or around an atom. I have searched this forum and the internet and I couldn't find a picture or explanation. Does anyone have a link to a nice picture of this, like that of a bar magnet's magnetic field lines, or a good explanation?

Another perhaps more simple question I have is: what is a common drift velocity observed in a superconductor? I know its very low in the electrical wires in our house for example (0.05 mm /s ). I read that in a superconductor the resistance (which as I understand is caused by electrons colliding with atoms) is virtually 0. So I assume the drift velocity of electrons in a superconductor is relatively high.
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QED-Kasper
#2
Mar29-10, 04:46 PM
P: 32
I am checking this thread for any answers every few hours since I made it (just to let you know).


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