Formula car cooling


by Ranger Mike
Tags: cooling, formula
Ranger Mike
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#19
Dec23-09, 08:49 AM
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I just may..my work takes me all over..i was at texas motor speedway a few years back before going to san antonio..lonnnnnnggg drive..


Merry Christmas Dr.


and all of you posters...your jaded cynical wry sense of humor keeps me on my toes...
just remember

age and deceit will always over come youth and enthusiasm!
dr dodge
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#20
Dec23-09, 09:02 AM
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happy holidays to you to ranger
and everyone else here
glad I found this place

dr
Ranger Mike
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#21
Aug2-10, 04:54 AM
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Rex raced the car this weekend..the temperature was 85 degrees F but the car water temperature was over 110 degrees C which is over 231 F...
how much more cooling can be expected if i plumb it back to series ..it is parallel plumbed as it came from t he factory..
we have 6 quarts coolant..would it help if i increased capacity by two or three quarts?
should we add another radiator core some where.
we have not tried splitters and think something more should be done..what do you think?

btw we won 2 20 lap races and got 2nd place on a 12 lap race..laps are 2.4 miles
dr dodge
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#22
Aug2-10, 05:51 AM
P: 336
how cool do you expect it to run? Maybe some kind of finned tubing added to the system (kind of like the baseboard heaters have) would sluff a little more temp. glad ya'll kicked some butt, too

dr
Ranger Mike
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#23
Aug2-10, 05:57 AM
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thanks..ideal temp is 90 to 100 C,,i think volume is the key...but need input from people wiser than I
xxChrisxx
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#24
Aug2-10, 06:13 AM
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tbh i'd just try adding more coolant for the moment. it's easy and if it fixes the problem, great. If not, then you it's deffo a heat transfer issue and you need to start looking at the plumbing.

Although two wins and a 2nd means the car must be holding togheter ok.

edit: Do you have the facilities for testing of some description?
Ranger Mike
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#25
Aug2-10, 07:19 AM
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we have a pretty good machine shop and can test just about anything...and thanks for the input..i think the coolant volume is not enough...adding 2 to 3 quart may do it..
brewnog
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#26
Aug2-10, 12:27 PM
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If your system is full, I don't see how adding volume will help by much at all. I'd be looking at increasing the size of your radiators (or getting more air flow over them).

Are you using water or glycol? Inhibited water will give you a few degrees over 50/50glycol mix.

Is 110deg C so bad?
Ranger Mike
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#27
Aug3-10, 04:58 AM
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i figured out why the car ran hotter on Sunday with same outside temperature. we added antifreeze to the water wetter and water coolant. as i understand it ,antifreeze will raise the boil point. i also went from 13 pound radiator cap to a 19 psi cap. the antifreeze acts as a slimy coating and cuts down on heat transfer to the aluminum radiators. everyone else is running distilled water and water wetter. also we are not running trick redline engine oil ..just synthetic Mobile 1 oil rated 5 w 30 and am told this is street car oil..all other cars running these narrow side pods are running temps of 90 to 100C which is ok with me..
brewnog
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#28
Aug3-10, 01:20 PM
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While antifreeze modifies the boiling point, its specific heat capacity is much lower than water. Simply put, a litre of glycol at 100deg C carries less heat from your engine than a litre of water.
Ranger Mike
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#29
Aug3-10, 01:26 PM
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thanks brewnog..makes sense to me...so adding some cooling fins and such may do more than upping the volume of water would...right?
xxChrisxx
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#30
Aug3-10, 01:56 PM
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You aren't going to get a significant increase with cooling fins + radiator over the radiators by themselves. Making the radiators work slightly better is a better bet.

I'd be more inclined to try different coolant, and see if any part of the radiator is getting bad airflow before adding fins.

I tend to tread lightly about adding stuff, as there tends to be scope for a little gain, but a large scope for screwing something up. eg. the fins may alter the airflow so the radiator is starved of air.
turbo
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#31
Aug3-10, 02:11 PM
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Hi, Ranger. I think that an aggressive coolant flush is called for, to clean the interior surfaces of your radiators, then go back to clean water and wetting agent to maximize surface-wetting and heat transfer. You've got to flush the entire coolant system, since the glycol will have glommed onto the rough-cast surfaces in the block. You need maximum heat transfer not only at the radiators but from the block to the coolant.

Did you manage to get a couple of oil-coolers installed downstream of your oil filter? That will knock down the load on your cooling system.
Ranger Mike
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#32
Aug4-10, 04:23 AM
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thanks turbo...am adding oil cooler before next outing and yes...i think flush is in order...wonder what i can flush to clean out all the antifreeze crap?
Ranger Mike
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#33
Aug4-10, 08:26 AM
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if water and water wetter boil at 250 degrees F with a 15 psi radiator cap
what temp will this boil with a 18 psi radiator cap?
turbo
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#34
Aug4-10, 08:36 AM
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Quote Quote by Ranger Mike View Post
thanks turbo...am adding oil cooler before next outing and yes...i think flush is in order...wonder what i can flush to clean out all the antifreeze crap?
You can get a flush kit from an automotive supply place. I believe that the stuff you add to your clean water after the initial flush is a caustic solution, like Drano, though it's probably buffered to prevent corrosion. You'd run that solution through the cooling system for a while, then drain and rinse several times with flushes of clean water, before filling with distilled water + wetting agent.

Ethylene glycol is very thick and slimy-feeling, and that can inhibit heat transfer both from the block to the coolant and from the coolant to the radiators.
brewnog
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#35
Aug4-10, 01:24 PM
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Oil coolers (unless with oil-air heat exchangers) won't help; in fact they'll make things worse. Oil coolers take heat from the oil (which would otherwise disspitate through the engine's surface area and exhaust) and put it to coolant, putting extra thermal load on your cooling system. An oil cooler can put anywhere between 2-20 degrees Celsius to coolant.

18psi vs 15psi, look up boiling point in a steam table. Mine's at work. I guess something in the region of 5-10 degrees Celsius.
Ranger Mike
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#36
Aug4-10, 01:32 PM
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thanks guys,,,,this forum is priceless regarding the experience and wealth of information and sage advice. i was thinking of air finned oil cooler if i can find in line model.
i think we will be safe with the water wetter and 18 psi cap...it never boiled at 240 deg F
you guys are great,,,thanks
rm


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