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Oldest writing in Europe

by Astronuc
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Astronuc
#1
Mar31-11, 06:41 PM
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Ancient Tablet Found: Oldest Readable Writing in Europe
Found at a site tied to myth, Greek tablet survived only by accident, experts say.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...mycenae-greek/

Found in an olive grove in what's now the village of Iklaina (map), the tablet was created by a Greek-speaking Mycenaean scribe between 1450 and 1350 B.C., archaeologists say.


An example of Celtic text - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lepontic_language#Texts

http://www.univie.ac.at/indogermanis...2_lepontic.pdf
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hypatia
#2
Mar31-11, 10:02 PM
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I wish they would of told us what the tablet said.
Evo
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Mar31-11, 10:10 PM
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Very interesting, did you see the supposedly 2,000 year old lead tablets bound into a book?

Astronuc
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Mar31-11, 10:12 PM
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Oldest writing in Europe

Quote Quote by Evo View Post
Very interesting, did you see the supposedly 2,000 year old lead tablets bound into a book?
Where's that. I've been rather distracted lately.
Evo
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Mar31-11, 10:44 PM
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Lead codices.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_theloo...istian-history
Proton Soup
#6
Mar31-11, 11:18 PM
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very weird. i've been watching someone posting a tribulation chart to an IRC channel for a few weeks now. this may cause some excitement. things could get interesting.
jim mcnamara
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Apr1-11, 10:56 AM
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Some biblio-experts find the whole thing to be very worthy of disbelief:

http://rogueclassicism.com/2011/03/3...ces-silliness/
Evo
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Apr1-11, 11:17 AM
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Quote Quote by jim mcnamara View Post
Some biblio-experts find the whole thing to be very worthy of disbelief:

http://rogueclassicism.com/2011/03/3...ces-silliness/
Yes, the hype of what they could be is typical. From what little is reported to be on them, such an interpretation is an incredible, seemingly unfounded leap, that is if they even turn out to be that old.

Phillip Davies on the plates.

http://zwingliusredivivus.wordpress....olls-whatever/
Evo
#9
Apr16-11, 08:56 AM
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Update- no shock here.

The lead codices: As we told you last month, some biblical scholars believe a trove of 70 lead codices that turned up five years ago in a remote cave in eastern Jordan may date from the 1st Century C.E. They say that references to the Messiah in the codices--which are made up of wirebound individual pages, roughly the size of a credit card--could bear invaluable testimony to the last days of Jesus' life. Much of the media ate the story up. "Never has there been a discovery of relics on this scale from the early Christian movement, in its homeland and so early in its history," reported the BBC.

But it's looking more and more like the codices are fakes. The "expert" who helped convince the media of that the codices might be authentic turns out to be a fringe figure at best. Meanwhile, Peter Thonemann, a prominent scholar of ancient history at Oxford University, found that two phrases of text in the codices came from an ordinary Roman tombstone on display in a museum in Jordan, suggesting that a forger had simply copied the lines from the tombstone. Thonemann pronounced the codices "a modern forgery, produced by a resident of Amman within the last fifty years or so." Other scholars have also cast serious doubt on the codices' authenticity.

In short, we can't say with absolute certainty that the codices are forgeries--but that's certainly what the balance of evidence suggests. So we've assigned the claim that the codices are an important new archaeological find to the second lowest level on our gauge--one step above flat-out bogus.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_theloo...eficit-problem
Dotini
#10
Jun28-11, 06:17 PM
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I'm sure you folks have heard of the interesting digs going on at Gobekli Tepe?

I know it's not quite in Europe, and I apologize, but there is no other thread for "oldest writing."

I would be honored if you thought this audio interview of science writer Charles C Mann, who has twice visited the dig at the 11,500 year old monument, were of some interest to you. He was able to spend a good deal of time with the archaeologist Klaus Schmidt, in charge of the dig for many years, and reveals heretofore unpublished insights into its greater antiquity and achievements.

Foremost of these is evidence of a proto-written language. This is found among the finely carved images, mainly animals, but also symbols such as waves and crescents found upon the huge rings of stone pillars. These are thought to work mnemonically, and may collectively constitute a language. They are studying it.

http://www.electricpolitics.com/podc...li_tepe_1.html

(This is a long interview. The part under discussion is found about 45% the way through)

Respectfully submitted,
Steve


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