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Would you eat in vitro meat even if were proven to be 100% safe?

by gravenewworld
Tags: 100%, meat, proven, safe, vitro
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Monique
#73
Feb3-12, 06:57 AM
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russ_watters, I didn't try anything. Clearly you didn't get my point:

Sure you can add all the essential nutrients to the in vitro meat, just like you could with any other food product (vitamin D to milk, fluoride to water). There are other viable replacements for meat as well, which are mostly being disregarded because we are "supposed" to eat meat.

As said, I don't see this in vitro meat as a viable replacement for my non-meat diet (my opinion). That's my answer to the OP
turbo
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Feb3-12, 07:15 AM
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Quote Quote by Monique View Post
As said, I don't see this in vitro meat as a viable replacement for my non-meat diet (my opinion). That's my answer to the OP
I couldn't bring myself to eat bio-engineered meat, any more than I could bring myself to eat other meat-substitutes. For some reason, when my neighbor (a good friend) swore off alcohol, he also gave up meat, eggs, dairy, etc, and eats a lot of soy substitutes. He is pretty strong, but he's at least 100# overweight, so the no-meat, no-booze diet of the last 10 years or so hasn't helped in that regard.

My wife actually enjoys Silk (Soy-milk). I'm not a big fan of milk now, but the thought of drinking a soy faux-milk with sweetening and flavorings repulses me. I'd have the same attitude toward in-vitro meats. There is a neighbor about a mile down this road that raises buffaloes (yep! the big-guys not the hybrid beefaloes) and I'm considering buying 1/4 of an animal this season. That would pack one of the freezers.
russ_watters
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Feb3-12, 07:22 AM
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Quote Quote by Monique
Sure you can add all the essential nutrients to the in vitro meat, just like you could with any other food product (vitamin D to milk, fluoride to water). There are other viable replacements for meat as well, which are mostly being disregarded because we are "supposed" to eat meat.

As said, I don't see this in vitro meat as a viable replacement for my non-meat diet (my opinion). That's my answer to the OP
That's still goalpost shifting, Monique. Being a vegitarian often may be exclusionary, but being a meat eater is not. Being a meat eater does not mean one can't still eat a veggi burger if they want. The positions are not symmetrical an you can't constrain the meat eating position to be like the vegitarian one.

The "supposed to eat meat" line strikes me as a charicature of a meat eater's position based on the fallacy that the position is exclusionary.
Monique
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Feb3-12, 08:11 AM
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If the in vitro meat is only meant for once in a while and not exclusionary, why would you even care about whether it is nutritionally equivalent to meat?

Do you remember that you said this:
Quote Quote by russ_watters
Clearly, if it did have significantly different nutritional content from regular meat, that would be problematic for providing a viable replacement for "real" meat (not that that would stop us from eating it for dessert if it tasted like creme brulee). But whether they succeed or faill, the question: 'if in vitro meat is not a viable replacement for natural meat, would you still eat it as a replacement for natural meat?' is a pretty silly question to ask, isn't it? Be reasonable: you can't make someone reject their position with a trollish beg-the-question/goalpost moving fallacy (not that you're the first to try that in this thread).
Now who is shifting the goalpost?
russ_watters
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Feb3-12, 09:00 AM
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You need to read it again because you must have missed something. There are a host of different reasons why one might eat this stuff and being a viable replacement is absolutely not required and that doesn't create a logical dilema for meat eaters.
daveb
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Feb3-12, 11:06 AM
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Quote Quote by Ryan_m_b View Post
I'm going to call naturalistic fallacy on this one. Animals also kill to ensure only they have sex, commit infanticide of rival's children and fling excrement at each other. Does that mean that we should too? Inflicting pain when you can avoid it is not a moral thing. This way of thinking extends throughout our species and societies and it isn't void to apply it to how we treat animals.
Plus, we're omnivores, not carnivores.
daveb
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Feb3-12, 11:10 AM
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Quote Quote by russ_watters View Post
The reason I asked is that it would seem to me that if someone was a vegitarian for environmental or ethics reasons, this would be free from such considerations, so I wonder if such a person would eat this.
Speaking as a vegan who is such for (primarily) environmental reasons, and (secondarily) for health and ethical reasons, given the caveat that it is 100% healthy, I can't logically claim I would not eat it, other than perhaps by that time my tastes have changed. For example, I used to hate avocado, yet for some odd reason, after I switched to veganism, I found that I liked them. The reverse might (though not likely) happen, that I've developed a taste revulsion to meat.
dwaring28720
#80
Feb3-12, 11:40 AM
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while reading the thread and the information i found the idea promising, obviously the cost at the moment is unrealistic but with the population growth the way it is, its definitely the way the future needs to be heading, my partner after having to hear me read every post on here said that she couldnt do without a kebab every now and then but with the prospect of a potentially healthy kebab she likes the idea too.

Whats the opinions of vegetarians on this, as it technically opens up the prospect of them eating meat as its not inhumane as an animal is not being slaughtered.

Good line of research anyway
Moonbear
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Feb3-12, 04:50 PM
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Quote Quote by Monique View Post
Certainly not, there is no organ system that would normally provide nutrients. Every essential nutrient needs to be synthetically provided in the form of supplements. The in vitro meat will lack for instance iron since there is no blood and vitamin B12 because there are no bacteria.
That's actually a good point about what would be considered in vitro meat. Meat comes from the muscles of animals, but that's not the only thing in it. It contains blood, fat deposits, connective tissues, etc. If it's just muscle cells grown in vitro, it would likely be pretty awful and nutritionally deficient. When I think of in vitro meat, I think of something that accurately replicates everything in actual meat. But, then, that's why I had a list of conditions before I'd eat it...or at least before I'd consider it an actual substitute for meat in my diet.
physics girl phd
#82
Feb4-12, 07:41 PM
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Quote Quote by Greg Bernhardt View Post
If it tastes good, sure!
I concur.
feathermoon
#83
Feb4-12, 10:57 PM
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Quote Quote by turbo View Post
I couldn't bring myself to eat bio-engineered meat, any more than I could bring myself to eat other meat-substitutes. For some reason, when my neighbor (a good friend) swore off alcohol, he also gave up meat, eggs, dairy, etc, and eats a lot of soy substitutes. He is pretty strong, but he's at least 100# overweight, so the no-meat, no-booze diet of the last 10 years or so hasn't helped in that regard.
I don't see from your statement why his diet would be a factor in his being overweight. Does he not exercise? Does he eat more carbs than he would if he ate meat? From what you mentioned he should lose some weight, thus I assume you haven't explained the situation entirely.

Anyway, it sounds like just an aversion to trying new things. What if someone snuck it into your food (assuming like everyone else previously that it was safe) and you didn't notice the difference? Would you feel averse if the same was done with a veggie burger?

Not that I'm saying you should WANT to try either, but soy and flavoring agents are added into seemingly everything these days, so avoiding them when they're packaged as meat substitutes is an interesting concept.
feathermoon
#84
Feb4-12, 11:20 PM
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Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
That's actually a good point about what would be considered in vitro meat. Meat comes from the muscles of animals, but that's not the only thing in it. It contains blood, fat deposits, connective tissues, etc. If it's just muscle cells grown in vitro, it would likely be pretty awful and nutritionally deficient. When I think of in vitro meat, I think of something that accurately replicates everything in actual meat. But, then, that's why I had a list of conditions before I'd eat it...or at least before I'd consider it an actual substitute for meat in my diet.
Frankly, to most people it will only be important that it contain the amino acids to taste like meat.
Monique
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Feb5-12, 04:03 AM
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Quote Quote by feathermoon View Post
Not that I'm saying you should WANT to try either, but soy and flavoring agents are added into seemingly everything these days, so avoiding them when they're packaged as meat substitutes is an interesting concept.
And soy milk is a natural product and a staple in Japanese and Chinese cuisine. One should like it for what it is, not for what one would like it to be. If you buy a Mercedes, don't expect it to drive like a BMW.
Loren Booda
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Feb5-12, 12:01 PM
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How about in vitro vegetables?
Ryan_m_b
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Feb5-12, 12:02 PM
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Quote Quote by Loren Booda View Post
How about in vitro vegetables?
That's easy; all you need is a glass plant pot, soil and seeds. Voilą!
netgypsy
#88
Feb6-12, 05:51 PM
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I LOVE this forum. Finally a group of people who enjoy a discussion about most anything.

In vitro veggies would grow just the part you eat, no stems, no root unless you eat the roots, and so on and I vote for this because I feel horribly guilty uprooting a carrot or yanking beans from the stalk.

I feel guilty every time I eat meet because the raising of, shipping of and slaughter of animals is not humane. I watched my grandmother slit the throat of a live chicken and it ran around and bled out in front of us. Not pretty. So I'm all for in vitro meat. What we eat now is really a crap shoot compared to European meats. They trace the animal from conception to consumption. If you get sick they know exactly what animal, what farm, what parents and what diet. You get sick on a fast food burger in the US and it probably came from 50 different place.

Yes I also know several fat vegetarians and they live on desserts. And they had a B12 deficiency too. (NOT fun - we had a family member who greatly reduced meat consumption due to a health problem and who didn't absorb well anyway and he lost all the feeling in his hands and feet from low B12 and folic acid. It did come back though)

No I don't like fake meat either although the chefs on "the Chew" tasted several and were unable to tell which was the real thing so I guess the ones out now are better than the ones I tried a number of years ago.

But in vitro meat is not fake and nothing is 100% safe - we all die sometime for some reason whether it be bad burger or bad driving. Bring it on. Glad they can finally do it.
Ryan_m_b
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Feb6-12, 05:56 PM
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Quote Quote by netgypsy View Post
I LOVE this forum. Finally a group of people who enjoy a discussion about most anything.

Quote Quote by netgypsy View Post
In vitro veggies would grow just the part you eat, no stems, no root unless you eat the roots, and so on and I vote for this because I feel horribly guilty uprooting a carrot or yanking beans from the stalk.
Plants and animals are very different. The methods used in in vitro tissue production aren't transferable to plants. Furthermore it isn't needed, if we really wanted to grow plants with just the parts we want to eat, higher nutrition, controlled environment etc we could just grow hydroponic GM crops.
Quote Quote by netgypsy View Post
Glad they can finally do it.
Unfortunately we're not there yet. The first "burger" is scheduled for this year and will cost over £250,000. There is a long way to go after that to get close to mass production and the obstacles we're facing are non-trivial.
netgypsy
#90
Feb6-12, 06:13 PM
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I'm aware that the technique to grow "just the interior" of an orange is not the same as that used to grow muscle. That doesn't mean it isn't possible.

By being there yet I meant the technology is there but obviously has to be first tweaked, then mass produced to get the price down. And probably subsidized for a while. But it's very exciting.

Reminds me of some book I read a million years ago where artificial wombs were available so women didn't have to go through pregnancy. Wonder how long that will take???


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