Relationship Between Uncertainty and Emergence (neuroscience)?


by PhysiPhile
Tags: emergence, neuroscience, relationship, uncertainty
PhysiPhile
PhysiPhile is offline
#19
Jan15-12, 03:20 PM
P: 24
Quote Quote by lavinia View Post
- What do you mean by classical linear mathematics?
The whole brain is not the sum of it's parts (emergence). Classical linear mathematics = sum of its parts.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonlinear_system

- What about the research on neural networks? My friend showed me an article where a clam's nervous system was completely described anatomically then modeled with a computer program. Interestingly, as I recall, the program sometimes reached what he called equilibrium states. But... if one thins of a nerve as a simple switch, then the brain no matter how complex is in theory modelable with a computer program, that is if no other effects make it into a quantum machine or some other machine that has not bee discovered yet.
That claim just isn't true. We are a very far away from modelling the brain because of the many boundary conditions needed that are unknown (see link above).
lavinia
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#20
Jan15-12, 03:26 PM
Sci Advisor
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Quote Quote by PhysiPhile View Post
The whole brain is not the sum of it's parts (emergence). Classical linear mathematics = sum of its parts.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonlinear_system



That claim just isn't true. We are a very far away from modelling the brain because of the many boundary conditions needed that are unknown (see link above).
Instead of referring me to a link why not explain to me why it isn't true.

I know what a non-linear system is but just can't imagine how this has to do with summing parts. Oh well. I will do some reading rather than clogging this thread with naive questions.
Thanks.
PhysiPhile
PhysiPhile is offline
#21
Jan15-12, 03:32 PM
P: 24
Quote Quote by lavinia View Post
Instead of referring me to a link why not explain to me why it isn't true.

I know what a non-linear system is but just can't imagine how this has to do with summing parts. Oh well. I will do some reading rather than clogging this thread with naive questions.
Thanks.
Yeah, I suggest doing some reading if you're interested in this topic. Then if you still have questions once you understand the basics don't hesitate to ask me! I'm learning more all the time about these concepts.
Bacle2
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#22
Jan15-12, 10:56 PM
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If you can get a hold of papers by this guy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnold_J._Mandell

I took a baby Chaos/Math Biology independent study class with him; brain function and chaos is all he talked about .

Sorry I could not find closer links.
PhysiPhile
PhysiPhile is offline
#23
Feb7-12, 10:29 PM
P: 24
Interesting update!

So at the risk of looking very foolish I brought up my idea to a neurologist who specializes in dementia at my medical school.

He told me that he actually published a paper on that topic that I brought up in my initial post. He approached it by using graph theory. I've attached the paper.


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