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Robotic extra intelligence?

by Flustered
Tags: extra, intelligence, robotic
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2milehi
#19
Feb21-12, 01:18 PM
P: 109


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JDStupi
#20
Feb21-12, 01:25 PM
P: 111
Here's my highly speculative reply:

I believe that the reason why aliens or other non-terrestrial life forms would not be "robots": i.e. made of inorganic matter is because of the nature of life.

What is one of the fundamental features of "life"? One of the most fundamental features of life in terms of both empirical observation and simple conceptual analysis is that of adaptivity. I do not believe we can make sense of the concept "life" without that of adaptivity.

Now my reasoning runs as follows:

Because life must be adaptive, it must store information in some physical form. As we all know, information can be stored in both inorganic and organic matter, however one of the distinctive features of organic materials is their thermal senstivity in a relatively narrow range of temperatures. This is the blessing and curse of organic matter as a choice for life. By virtue of being easily thermally deformable it is easy to affect the functioning of an organic system by adding energy and changing the entropically favorable state, which can lead to problems with homeostasis or can lead to cancer, hence curse. This is also the blessing, because in order to adapt to the environment the organism must sense and react to its environment, which means "updating" its information content fluidly. This, I believe is the benefit of organic matter for life. It is more thermally efficient to enact a chemical reaction to slightly change the "temperature" (to the extent that we can speak of temperature) in the area and adapt to its environment.

"Robot" matter, on the other hand, is mostly intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors characterized by, structurally, being atoms in a lattice. Lattices, of course, are often known for the strength of their bonds. So when designing computers and adding software to them, we don't want the functioning of the computer to be effected by the thermal substratum, so a strong not-easily thermally deformable material would be easier to deal with, however if you want to be able to fluidly change "your own" structure, being built of a strong lattice may not be the best choice.

So, the distinction and inter-relations between the physical dynamics and the information storage, the "hardware" and "software" is more important for "life" then for "robots".

This is of course highly speculative, and could be wrong, because there are ongoing AI resesearch porgrammes that use adaptive behavior in inorganic matter, so evidently the way I am using adaptive is not quite identical. May be more general or of a different type. Also, the reproduction process would be difficult for inorganic matter for pretty much the same reasons.
Flustered
#21
Feb22-12, 10:02 AM
P: 75
So just because life forms a certain way on earth, (evolution etc) therefor all life has to evolve? I read something about life being possible in a pool of acid, something to that degree on a moon of jupiter I think.. That would mean they were no water, so life can come from different forms of particles.
russ_watters
#22
Feb22-12, 12:17 PM
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P: 22,303
No, it isn't the way it evolved that matters here, it is the fact that it evolved. Robots don't evolve on their own.
Ryan_m_b
#23
Feb22-12, 02:04 PM
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Evolution requires reproduction with variation under environmental attrition. Abiogenesis is the study of how life started and whilst we do not have a comprehensive theory of abiogenesis we know enough to know that machines as we make them cannot just magically pop up out of the ground.

Aside from this anything that had metabolic activity, could reproduce and repair itself/engage in activity on the molecular scale would stretch the definition of robot IMO. We might find life with alternative biochemistry (perhaps even with far more metal involved than in any Earth life) but it will still be life, it will still rely on biochemistry.
Quote Quote by Flustered View Post
So just because life forms a certain way on earth, (evolution etc) therefor all life has to evolve? I read something about life being possible in a pool of acid, something to that degree on a moon of jupiter I think.. That would mean they were no water, so life can come from different forms of particles.
It is not necessarily water that is necessary but some form of solvent in which biochemistry can take place.
Megatronlol
#24
Feb22-12, 09:09 PM
P: 1
I think you need to refine your definition of robot in this case. I wonder if it could be possible for metallic lifeforms to evolve? Their inner workings wouldn't consist of computers, because computers don't arise naturally, they're obviously the result of intelligent life. Their bodies may function similarly to ours, in the sense they may have evolved their own brains, hearts, nervous system, etc.

http://www.engadget.com/2011/09/19/s...nthetic-metal/

http://myownscientia.blogspot.com/20...m-of-life.html
Hobin
#25
Feb23-12, 03:38 AM
P: 194
Quote Quote by Megatronlol View Post
I think you need to refine your definition of robot in this case. I wonder if it could be possible for metallic lifeforms to evolve? Their inner workings wouldn't consist of computers, because computers don't arise naturally, they're obviously the result of intelligent life. Their bodies may function similarly to ours, in the sense they may have evolved their own brains, hearts, nervous system, etc.
Well, if we're going to discuss definitions...

"From Czech robot, from robota (“drudgery, servitude”). Coined in the 1921 science-fiction play R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots) by Karel Čapek after having been suggested to him by his brother Josef , and taken into the English translation without change." [link]

So for any reasonable definition of robot, and considering what robots do these days, it is reasonable to conclude that anything we'd call a robot doesn't evolve on its own.
Johninch
#26
Feb23-12, 04:02 AM
P: 96
Quote Quote by Flustered View Post
My question is, is it possible for aliens to be ROBOTS? I don't mean robots as in, another race built them, but i mean NATURAL robots that came from the earth it self, through evolution.......When I refer to robot, i mean operating on circuits, mechanical.
We have said several times that robots or any other life form have to EVOLVE. And nobody thinks that mechanical/electrical robots as we know them can appear out of the earth. So I think that this part of the question is fully answered, unless the OP can describe what he means by "coming from the earth itself".

Robots as we know them have already evolved, they are here in every modern factory. So what's the question? Our robots are not alien, but it's pefectly imaginable that alien robots exist. For me the discussion is complete.
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Ryan_m_b
#27
Feb23-12, 11:16 AM
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Another angle to this: genetic algorithms are used to evolve robotic designs


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