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Tangier Island, VA - accent

by Ouabache
Tags: accent, island, tangier
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AlephZero
#19
Mar24-11, 06:49 PM
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Quote Quote by Ouabache View Post
You were thinking they sounded possibly, West Country (UK) but not Brummie.
Just for info, I think somebody has mixed up two different regions here.

West Country is the extreme south-west of England, i.e. Devon and Cornwall

West Midlands is the region around Birmingham (approximately the center of England) and west to the border with Wales. Brummie is the acccent in the city of Birmingham itself. The region close to Birmingham is also called the Black Country (because of the number of factories built there in the Industrial Revolution).

The accent in the video is west country - nothing like the west midlands accent. The main feature IMO is the extreme difference in length between the very long and very short vowels, and the fact that groups of short syllables are almost run together without the consonants
AlephZero
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Mar24-11, 07:00 PM
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Quote Quote by jarednjames View Post
Could even be Yorkshire language wise, not sure with the accent.
I didn't spot any Yorkshire dialect words (My ancestors are 50% Yorkshire and 50% Lincolnshire).

The Yorks accent is completely different - very "flat" vowel sounds.

Yorkshire dialect is mainly Scandinavian origin (as were the people). 50 years ago it was said that a non-English-speaking Norweedish person and a typical Yorkshire dalesman could understand each other well enough to communicate, without any language lessons.
JaredJames
#21
Mar24-11, 07:33 PM
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Quote Quote by AlephZero View Post
I didn't spot any Yorkshire dialect words (My ancestors are 50% Yorkshire and 50% Lincolnshire).

The Yorks accent is completely different - very "flat" vowel sounds.

Yorkshire dialect is mainly Scandinavian origin (as were the people). 50 years ago it was said that a non-English-speaking Norweedish person and a typical Yorkshire dalesman could understand each other well enough to communicate, without any language lessons.
Yeah, I didn't think the accent matched Yorkshire.

I've only heard snippets of "olde english" and it varies widely depending where you go.

I stand by my initial guess and agree with you that it's west country.
Loren Booda
#22
Mar24-11, 07:43 PM
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I saw a news segment saying that Tangier Island is becoming inundated. They live some 100 miles away, as the dragon flies.
Ouabache
#23
Mar31-11, 04:55 AM
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Quote Quote by jarednjames View Post
I live in Wales, which is just North of Cornwall.

Been there a few times and the accent is very similar. But, it still sounds older. Particularly the language used.
That is interesting that you live in Wales. I wonder can you speak or understand Welsh?

I have learned, the way English is spoken (pronunciations) in various parts of the UK
is strongly influenced by predecessor languages of those regions
(e.g. Irish, Scots Gaelic, Welsh, Breton etc..)
In the case of Cornwall. The predecessor language was Cornish.
Here is a fellow reportedly speaking Cornish



(if that link does not embed properly, here is the direct
link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jbxdZE3g80

From what I am reading, Cornish is one of the Celtic languages more closely related
to Welsh than to Irish or Scots Gaelic.
(It shares 75% basic vocabulary with Welsh).

I can hear some of the same inflections heard in the Tangier Island, English pronunciations.
JaredJames
#24
Mar31-11, 09:08 AM
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Quote Quote by Ouabache View Post
That is interesting that you live in Wales. I wonder can you speak or understand Welsh?
Bits and pieces, I can understand more than I can speak.

But for the purpose of everyday life (people have a thing with "do you speak Welsh?"), the answer is no. Otherwise they expect you to churn out spools of it.

If anyone finds themselves in that situation, it's best to just start spitting and clearing your throat and claim it's Shakespeare.
In the case of Cornwall. The predecessor language was Cornish.
Here is a fellow reportedly speaking Cornish

From what I am reading, Cornish is one of the Celtic languages more closely related
to Welsh than to Irish or Scots Gaelic.
(It shares 75% basic vocabulary with Welsh).
From what I can hear, this snippet is not that similar to Welsh. However, I can't hear him properly so I can't guarantee what I thought he was saying.

His accent doesn't sound 'west country' to me though, it's lacking that 'farmer' quality (that would be my own description of the accent). I've been to Bristol a few times and the accent there was bang on what I'm hearing in the Tangier's video. Same area, but like I say, can't hear the video properly so could just be me.
FieldHockey
#25
Jul25-11, 01:18 AM
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I live close to this island and know many people who live/lived there and have visited the island many times. The island was first explored by John Smith in 1608 and they actually say that what they speak is a form of an older English dialect. Many of the things they say are backwards. For instance if it is sunny outside and calm waters they will say that it is not a nice day outside when in reality it is actually a gorgeous day outside. Hope this helps!
zoobyshoe
#26
Jul25-11, 03:11 AM
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Quote Quote by FieldHockey View Post
I live close to this island and know many people who live/lived there and have visited the island many times. The island was first explored by John Smith in 1608 and they actually say that what they speak is a form of an older English dialect. Many of the things they say are backwards. For instance if it is sunny outside and calm waters they will say that it is not a nice day outside when in reality it is actually a gorgeous day outside. Hope this helps!
I just read a novel called "Isle of Dogs", much of which concerns Tangier. The book is a comedy, so things are exaggerated, but she explains the whole "talking backward" thing, which is pretty interesting. The author says there'll be a gesture to the left, usually with the head, to indicate when they're "talking backward". When the speaker can't be seen, as at night, or on the phone, they'll end their backward talk with the phrase, "to the left". So, "It's a gorgeous, sunny day! To the left," would mean the weather's miserable out. The whole thing was a useful code to befuddle outsiders back in the day.
TylerH
#27
Jul25-11, 04:16 AM
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I don't study accents, so my ear may be less able to distinguish one accent from another than yours, but their accents remind me of those of some of my (older) relatives from the Appalachian Mountains of Western North Carolina. Especially in how they are lazy with pronouncing everything and elongate some syllables.
Loren Booda
#28
Jul25-11, 10:37 AM
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It's cold today in Virginia -- knot!
E.kind
#29
Mar8-12, 06:05 AM
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I'm a Newfoundlander and is does resemble some Newfoundland dialects (particularly those around the South to Southwest coast) where people immigrated from Somerset and Bristol among other areas. Although, it does have that American twang in there. I have to listen pretty hard to pick out what they are saying. People on islands like Newfoundland and Tangier have been able to retain some of the olde/orginal English language due to isolation. Although I can tell you that in recent (20) years, in Newfoundland, it has been fading.
If you have been to Newfoundland and everyone sounds "kinda Irish", then perhaps you have not travelled outside the greater capital area/St. John's where the majority of folks did migrate from Southeast Ireland. Newfoundland is full of distinctively sounding and rich dialects.
Of course, you have to keep in mind sociolinguistics whereby people of deep sea fishing outports and communities somehow seem to share parts of their language or more correctly the rhythm of speech.

Hope this helps. So glad I came across this thread.
arildno
#30
Mar8-12, 06:25 AM
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Anyway, it is UGLY, like the horrid dialects we have around Trondheim, Stavanger (Randaberg in particular), and most of the Eastern Fold' dialects.
Dreadful dialects, dreadful people.
E.kind
#31
Mar8-12, 01:31 PM
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Pity to see such xenophobia here, arildno. I suppose an education in physics does not always equal being worldly or culturally appreciative.
arildno
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Mar8-12, 01:49 PM
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Quote Quote by E.kind View Post
Pity to see such xenophobia here, arildno. I suppose an education in physics does not always equal being worldly or culturally appreciative.
What was xenophobic?
Some dialects are uglier than others, I gave three examples of Norwegian dialects I find ugly.
zoobyshoe
#33
Mar8-12, 07:44 PM
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Quote Quote by arildno View Post
What was xenophobic?
Some dialects are uglier than others, I gave three examples of Norwegian dialects I find ugly.
The Tangier dialect is not at all ugly to an American ear. It's quaint, and I wanted to hear more of it.
arildno
#34
Mar9-12, 02:01 AM
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Quote Quote by zoobyshoe View Post
The Tangier dialect is not at all ugly to an American ear. It's quaint, and I wanted to hear more of it.
That does not make me xenophobic, either.
Just because aesthetics is a local standard (similar to assigning labels "left"/"right"), doesn't make it any less true
MarcoD
#35
Mar9-12, 02:14 AM
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I needed to listen to some of it a few times, but it is pretty understandable once you get the hang of it.

But the reason I responded. A question I've always had. What's the dialect of Nicolas Cage? I always find is sounds pretty cool.
zoobyshoe
#36
Mar9-12, 02:17 AM
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Quote Quote by MarcoD View Post
But the reason I responded. A question I've always had. What's the dialect of Nicolas Cage? I always find is sounds pretty cool.
Cageian. Not to be confused with Cajun.


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