how true/accurate is Gasland


by CAC1001
Tags: gasland, true or accurate
KingNothing
KingNothing is offline
#55
Feb17-12, 12:21 AM
P: 949
What frustrates me is that it's so hard to form a real opinion without being an expert on the subject yourself. I can't trust the filmmakers or their targets, because they all have an agenda and $$ to make.

For what it's worth, I drink Colorado groundwater pretty much daily.
DrClapeyron
DrClapeyron is offline
#56
Feb17-12, 01:29 AM
P: 128
Operators do not want to fracture more than the target formation. If they do then they stand to lose formation pressure, which would lead to a loss in production volume, and a loss in investors. Every bit of logical sense points toward something other than fracking as the cause of methane contamination.

It is more than possible that shoddy casing jobs and dumping of waste water could contaminate wells, or natural causes or people lying about the history and levels of contamination in their water wells. I think people are jumping on the fracking bandwagon because it is a convenient, scary word.

Alternatively, these people could be supporters of coal and view such drilling activities as detrimental to thier preferred coal. :)
nicoleannB
nicoleannB is offline
#57
Feb18-12, 02:31 AM
P: 2
Oil prices are set by commodities traders who buy and sell futures contracts on the commodities exchanges. These are agreements to buy or sell oil at a specific date in the future at a specific price. According to a recent survey, gasoline costs in the U.S. have increased by almost 12 cents a gallon over the past three weeks. The price increase is held accountable, at least in part, on the rising price of crude oil in the North Sea. Those Middle Eastern tensions include threats by Iran to block vital shipping lanes, the higher cost of summer-grade fuel and a decreased refinery capacity. Another factor affecting the hike is increased gasoline consumption in developing nations, such as India and China. Thus, Gas prices will continue to rise. Consumer spending is necessary for the economy to improve and recover.
aquitaine
aquitaine is offline
#58
Feb18-12, 10:47 AM
P: 201
What frustrates me is that it's so hard to form a real opinion without being an expert on the subject yourself. I can't trust the filmmakers or their targets, because they all have an agenda and $$ to make.

For what it's worth, I drink Colorado groundwater pretty much daily.

Well this is a science forum, surely there are people here who are experts.........


In any case it is unfortunate that energy, despite being critical for civilization, is the most politicized form of engineering there is. That makes it so hard to have real solutions to our problems.
DoggerDan
DoggerDan is offline
#59
Feb21-12, 06:07 AM
P: 77
Quote Quote by aquitaine View Post
In any case it is unfortunate that energy, despite being critical for civilization, is the most politicized form of engineering there is. That makes it so hard to have real solutions to our problems.
Yes, it has been politicized, at all levels, including non-monitored message forums. Energy involves science. These issues should not be politicized. They should be based on science and fact, provided that science passes most of its own accord in the appropriate real-world, objective venues, rather than a couple of twisted minds on some self-acclaimed but far from it "science" forum.
Office_Shredder
Office_Shredder is offline
#60
Mar9-12, 05:22 PM
Mentor
P: 4,499
http://m.cbsnews.com/storysynopsis.r...0&videofeed=36

Sketchy stuff going on in Ohio


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