Physics of Martial Arts?


by Gaijinja
Tags: martial arts, physics
aigui
aigui is offline
#19
Feb19-12, 02:08 AM
P: 2
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/061..._XEiKob03G8MGA
or http://www.aikisecrets.com/

This book is amazing! I've practiced martial arts for over 10 years now and never have I had things explained so clearly. I would highly recommend this one. The author does explain from his core martial are, Aikido, however the principles are applicable for all martial arts. He also plans to write a follow up explaining farther and then a third book relating the same principles to sports in general. Please give this one a try regardless of your martial art background!
Fightscience
Fightscience is offline
#20
Feb21-12, 10:50 PM
P: 5
http://www.amazon.com/Parting-Clouds-Science of the Martial Arts

The way of Aikido is one that is dominated by locks and throws, the unbalancing of an opponent and leverage. The way of karate and taekwondo encompassed such techniques but is more orientated towards high impact strikes such as kicks and punches. In the book Parting the Clouds the author concentrates on the scientific principles involved in making these strikes effective. It is the most technical piece of work ever seen. As an example, it shows the equations and calculations needed to determine how much energy is needed to break a wooden board and then shows how to calculate if a person can achieve this. There are parts of the book that could be read in a Physics classroom – there are parts that are for use for self defense on the streets. Grenville Harrop, the author, is a high grade (4th degree black belt) fighter and a Master of Science. The link above is provided for convenience – the site shows the table of contents of the book.
aigui
aigui is offline
#21
Mar14-12, 04:05 AM
P: 2
Quote Quote by Fightscience View Post
http://www.amazon.com/Parting-Clouds-Science of the Martial Arts

It is the most technical piece of work ever seen. As an example, it shows the equations and calculations needed to determine how much energy is needed to break a wooden board and then shows how to calculate if a person can achieve this.
As an engineer and martial artist I'm intrigued. I think I might check the book out, but what exactly should I expect to get from it? Was there anything in particular that really opened your eyes when reading? Technical is great but surely there is improved application to one's martial arts, right?
Fightscience
Fightscience is offline
#22
Apr4-12, 07:29 PM
P: 5
As an engineer and martial artist you will know what is meant when an instructor talks about momentum or force; Parting the Clouds is the first book to really go back to first principles (Newton’s laws and the conservation of energy and momentum) and then apply these to the kicks and punches of the martial arts. Just as one example the book discusses how important speed and mass is to a strike and then shows the optimal balance between speed and mass - (as opposed to being heavy but slow or very fast but too light). It spends a lot of time on kicks and the distinctions between thrust and snap, and goes over how to create the highest impact force through the energy of the strike, its penetration and contact time. It's written by a Fourth Dan Shotokan karate ka who is also a Master of Science from a British University. Hope this helps.
ErolDynamics
ErolDynamics is offline
#23
Apr5-12, 06:08 PM
P: 16
there ar many good programs that i don't remembered their name at discovey channel,national geographic and history tv. may be you can search for


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Martial arts. General Discussion 144
Martial Arts General Discussion 15
Moment of inertia and martial arts General Physics 3
Martial arts and the sixth sense General Discussion 67
Martial Arts Classical Physics 3