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New Macroeconomic Growth Theory?

by Dbouchard92
Tags: growth, macroeconomic, theory
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Dbouchard92
#1
Apr7-12, 02:53 PM
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I recently came up with a theory that was the product of a 2 hour long thought experiment. Its more of a correlary than a theory I suppose. Please share input but approach it with an open mind and don't form an opinion without giving it a chance. Here it goes. According to Carl H. Flygt, "the thesis of linguistic determinism is the idea that nothing is available to human consciousness outside its capacity to apply words to it."(Flygt 1). Assuming this is true, isn't it quite possible that to advance the intellectual capabilities of a single society(a society that speaks only one language), that a possible way to achieve this goal is by simply creating more words in the language. Creating more words will allow people of this hypothetical society to escape the limits of human consciousness proposed by the thesis of linguistic determinism, therefore increasing the likelyhood of discoveries and the like.
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Pyrrhus
#2
Apr7-12, 03:24 PM
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First, this is not a theory. This is an hypothesis.

Second, there is correlation with new knowledge (e.g. invention) and new words. For example, new words like transistor, chip, operating system, and similar are related to the invention of the computer system. Also, the same applies for new words for the internet, website, and similar. Thus, basically the question becomes what came first the new words or the invention? the answer is the invention of course.
Pyrrhus
#3
Apr7-12, 03:28 PM
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For an economist, the question becomes Do technological changes lead to increases in productivity?. For example, Do the education in a developed country means that a laborer is able to contribute more to the production in comparison to a laborer in a developing country?. This is the way that economists think of education, and technology in economic growth.

Dbouchard92
#4
Apr7-12, 03:40 PM
P: 4
New Macroeconomic Growth Theory?

As a response to Pyrrhus: I have a follow up question to your response. I have studied economics and therefore think like an economist. In order to speed the economy wide growth process in the United States, would it be to our advantage for government to subsidize the creation of a job that assigns words to concepts and objects which don't already have words in the English language? Could it be possible that funding this new "area of study"(the study of creating more words for the purpose of further understanding concepts in the Universe) in colleges across the U.S. could be beneficial in the long run?
micromass
#5
Apr7-12, 03:51 PM
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Quote Quote by Dbouchard92 View Post
would it be to our advantage for government to subsidize the creation of a job that assigns words to concepts and objects which don't already have words in the English language?
No. Just no.
Dbouchard92
#6
Apr7-12, 05:17 PM
P: 4
Quote Quote by micromass View Post
No. Just no.
If you're going to draw the conclusion that my proposition is wrong, at least have the courtesy to defend it and help me understand your reasoning.
micromass
#7
Apr7-12, 05:23 PM
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No. This thread is too silly.


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