One-to-one and onto


by nicnicman
Tags: onetoone
nicnicman
nicnicman is offline
#1
Nov18-12, 07:30 PM
P: 136
To me this problem doesn't seem right. Here it is:

Is the following function one-to-one, onto, both, or neither?
f: R→N f(x) = ceiling 2x/3

My answer: onto

Although, wouldn't this function be invalid since it produces negative numbers and the set of natural numbers doesn't include negatives? Consider f(-1.5) = -1.

Am I misunderstanding a concept?
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Simplicity is key to co-operative robots
Chemical vapor deposition used to grow atomic layer materials on top of each other
Earliest ancestor of land herbivores discovered
johnqwertyful
johnqwertyful is offline
#2
Nov18-12, 08:38 PM
P: 308
A lot of people would consider the ceiling function to be f:R->Z.
It would be invalid to say it's f:R->N Unless you restrict R to R+
nicnicman
nicnicman is offline
#3
Nov18-12, 08:45 PM
P: 136
Well, that's the way is worded in the book, so it must be a typo. Maybe the writers meant to put Z rather than N.

Would my answer be correct if were R to Z?

Thanks for the help.

johnqwertyful
johnqwertyful is offline
#4
Nov18-12, 08:52 PM
P: 308

One-to-one and onto


Agreed.


Register to reply