Language fails that make you angry


by KingNothing
Tags: angry, fails, language
Evo
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#235
Nov21-12, 07:59 PM
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Quote Quote by AlephZero View Post
THe best reply to somebody who tries to "correct" prepositions at the end of sentences is

"This is pedantry of a type up with which I will not put".

The technical term is "hypercorrection" - or "if it ain't broke, keep fixing it till it is".
My third grade teacher drilled in the fact that we were NEVER to end a sentence with a proposition.

I get that many sentences really do not need a prepostion at the end. "Where did you go to?" is simpler as "Where did you go?"

But I realize now that there are times when ending with a preposition is ok.
FreeMitya
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#236
Nov21-12, 08:15 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
My third grade teacher drilled in the fact that we were NEVER to end a sentance with a proposition. But when I write grammatically correct sentences, I've been told I sound shakespearian.

I COULD CARE LESS!!
After some research I discovered that this is more debated than I initially thought.

For the sake of a "second" opinion, Alexander Pope said:
This is an idiom, which our language is strongly inclined to: it prevails in common conversations, and suits very well with the familiar style in writing: but the placing of the preposition before the relative, is more graceful, as well as more perspicuous; and agrees much better with the solemn and elevated style.
This was taken from my copy of "The New Fowler's Modern English Usage". Yes, I am a nerd.
Galteeth
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#237
Nov22-12, 02:33 PM
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Quote Quote by FreeMitya View Post
After some research I discovered that this is more debated than I initially thought.

For the sake of a "second" opinion, Alexander Pope said:


This was taken from my copy of "The New Fowler's Modern English Usage". Yes, I am a nerd.
For the purposes of writing fiction however, often subtle "breaking" of the rules of language in ways that are commonly used can differentiate the speech of characters and establish different tones for different speakers.
FreeMitya
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#238
Nov22-12, 04:26 PM
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Quote Quote by Galteeth View Post
For the purposes of writing fiction however, often subtle "breaking" of the rules of language in ways that are commonly used can differentiate the speech of characters and establish different tones for different speakers.
Certainly. Here's an excerpt from The Sound and the Fury:

When the shadow of the sash appeared on the curtains it was between seven and eight o' clock and then I was in time again, hearing the watch. It was Grandfather's and when Father gave it to me he said I give you the mausoleum of all hope and desire; it's rather excruciating-ly apt that you will use it to gain the reducto absurdum of all human experience which can fit your individual needs no better than it fitted his or his father's.
Though it is not, in my experience, a common error, "reducto absurdum" is obviously incorrect. In an edition of Reading Faulkner: Glossary and Commentary devoted the The Sound and the Fury, Stephen M. Ross/Noel Polk had this to say about the error:

The incorrect phrasing may be a joke on either Mr. Compson's or Quentin's part; or, along with the hyphen in "excruciating-ly," the mis-stated Latin could hint that Quentin remembers Mr. Compson as drunk when he speaks and thus not in full command of his words. It unlikely an error on Faulkner's part.
http://books.google.ca/books?id=hW5o...surdum&f=false
nazarbaz
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#239
Nov23-12, 05:01 AM
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Je parle anglais comme une vache espagnole... I talk english like a spanish cow, would say the french... If you ever meet my posts and you find my wording and my grammatical structures wrong or wierd, this is normal... I learned it trying to decipher Frank Zappa lyrics and I'm still learning... The cult of "correctness" has its adverse effects though... In France, they have a very old institution in charge of defending the right "usage" of language, l'Académie française... An assembly of very old writers and intellectuals who earn very confortable wages for it... They are called the immortals and they issue a volume of their dictionary once every 10 years or so... Still stuck on the letter M or N after decades of work... Sweet or mad people, I don't know...
Fredrik
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#240
Nov23-12, 07:08 AM
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Quote Quote by vela View Post
How would you rewrite "The region was fought over"?
Quote Quote by FreeMitya View Post
"This is a region over which a battle was fought."
How would you rewrite "I screwed up"?
Andre
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#241
Nov23-12, 07:20 AM
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Quote Quote by Fredrik View Post
How would you rewrite "I screwed up"?
FreeMitya
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#242
Nov23-12, 07:34 AM
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Quote Quote by Fredrik View Post
How would you rewrite "I screwed up"?
"I made a mistake." "Screwed" in that context is slang anyway and would not be used in formal writing. "I messed up" could also be revised to "I made a mistake," or one could say "I made a mess of this." You might consider these to be reaches, but there is no difference in meaning.


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