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Fictional Authors...

by TheStatutoryApe
Tags: authors, fictional
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AnTiFreeze3
#19
Jul15-12, 07:25 PM
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P: 251
MARK TWAIN MARK TWAIN MARK TWAIN!!!

How has he not been brought up yet?

EDIT:

He was in the link that Evo posted, but I would still assume that he would be one of the more prominent authors to have used a pseudonym. Maybe the terminology of the OP confused some people, what with it not being the normal term used to describe an author writing under another name.
2AlphaMales?!
#20
Jul16-12, 07:50 AM
P: 14
Quote Quote by Ryan_m_b View Post
I've read all the culture novels aside from the short story collection, indeed the description of hells in matter was quite horrifying.
"Matter" is the one with the aristocratic family, the shell world and the hidden implanted cerebral "matter/anti-matter" explosive suicide bomber device. Surface Detail is the one with the hells and the tatoo'd fem who bites off the baddy's nose at the start. I have read the collection of short stories - 'twas good fun.
BWV
#21
Jul16-12, 01:02 PM
P: 328
zoobyshoe
#22
Jul16-12, 03:46 PM
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If we're simply listing authors who wrote under pseudonyms then Anthony Burgess should be mentioned. His real legal name was John Wilson. He also originally published some of his books under the pseudonym Joseph Kell.

A propos: in A Clockwork Testament or Enderby's End by Burgess, the title character, Enderby, is giving a lecture to a literature class and suddenly can't remember what he was going to lecture about, so he confabulates a fictional author on the spot:

In a classroom scene, for example, Enderby is unable to remember his planned lecture on minor Elizabethan dramatists and so on the spur of the moment invents a playwright called 'Gervase Whitelady'. He discourses learnedly on this personage for some time, helped on by a student who begins as a know-it-all but ends as a collaborator, earnestly prompting him with the details of Whitelady's life. Enderby abruptly concludes the lecture by dismissing his imaginary playwright as a failureŚ at which point he recognises his creation as a mirror image of himself.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Clo...erby's_End

It's an interesting book. It's Burgess' fictional self-satire on the theme of what happened to him after he suddenly became famous when Kubrick turned one of his obscure books into a blockbuster movie.
ImaLooser
#23
Nov24-12, 06:27 AM
P: 570
Quote Quote by TheStatutoryApe View Post
Tim Powers and James Blaylock went beyond the nom de plume and created the poet William Ashbless apparently as a response (or prank) to the poets printed in the Cal State Fullerton magazine of their time. Since then Mr. Ashbless has made cameos in books by both writers. Two books have been written by the two friends in William Ashbless' name.

Does anyone else know of any fictitious authors or interesting occurances of authors using nom de plumes? I understand Gulliver's Travels was written under a nom de plume by Swift.
HP Lovecraft wrote about a fictional book called the Necromicon.

Borges write about a fictional encyclopedia of Tlon. The world likes it so much that it adopts it and the world becomes Tlon. Great!
Darwin123
#24
Nov24-12, 06:53 PM
P: 741
Quote Quote by ImaLooser View Post
HP Lovecraft wrote about a fictional book called the Necromicon. !
...which was written by the mad Arab, Abdul Harishad. I think that was the name. Not quite a nom de plume, since Lovecraft never wrote any version of the Necromicon. But definitely a fictional author.

Moby Dick was written by some author. Call him Ismael.
ImaLooser
#25
Nov24-12, 07:24 PM
P: 570
Quote Quote by Darwin123 View Post
...which was written by the mad Arab, Abdul Harishad. I think that was the name. Not quite a nom de plume, since Lovecraft never wrote any version of the Necromicon. But definitely a fictional author.
The Necromicon is available as a DVD.
ImaLooser
#26
Dec4-12, 05:12 AM
P: 570
There was Ossian. Accoding to Wikipedia...

Ossian (Scottish Gaelic: Oisean) is the narrator and purported author of a cycle of epic poems published by the Scottish poet James Macpherson from 1760. Macpherson claimed to have collected word-of-mouth material in the Scots Gaelic said to be from ancient sources, and that the work was his translation of that material. .... Contemporary critics were divided in their view of the work's authenticity, but the consensus since is that Macpherson framed the poems himself, based on old folk tales he had collected, and that "Ossian" is, in the words of Thomas Curley, "the most successful literary falsehood in modern history."


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