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Friction and Tension along a Curved Path

by aeb2335
Tags: friction curved path
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aeb2335
#1
Dec19-12, 05:35 PM
P: 25
I just want to make sure my thinking and free body is correct before I go further in a project I am working on; for some strange reason (probably the curved path) I am doubting myself.

I will try and explain the problem but the attached image is probably the best description.

There is a beam that is pinned at A on one end and free to move along a path of constant curvature (a circle) at the other end; There is a force of tension FT that acts on the beam at an angle θ with a coefficient of friction of μs. Neglect gravity.
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Studiot
#2
Dec19-12, 05:52 PM
P: 5,462
I expect if you were to post your information a bit more legibly and actually state your question you might receive an answer.

If this is homework then you should read the instructions about posting it.
rdbateman
#3
Dec19-12, 05:55 PM
P: 30
Can you redraw the graph? Its not clear to me and I have bad eyes :(

aeb2335
#4
Dec19-12, 06:52 PM
P: 25
Friction and Tension along a Curved Path

Yea I never really did state the actual problem I got a bit too excited. The question is for what angles theta phi and gamma does the beam stay in static equilibrium. I will re-post a better picture shortly.
rdbateman
#5
Dec19-12, 10:54 PM
P: 30
Lmao!


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