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Voltage on a positively charged object?

by kjamha
Tags: charged, object, positively, voltage
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kjamha
#1
Jan5-13, 12:11 PM
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If I charge a van de graaff to say 10,000 V I would think of the voltage as electric pressure. There would be so many electrons looking to escape the metal ball, and this overcrowding of the electrons (electrostatic forces) would create electric pressure, or voltage. If my analogy is off, then the question I have might not make sense and I will have to revise. But I am wondering about an object that has a large deficit of electrons (positively charged). Does this object, just like the van de graaff, have a voltage associated with it? If so, would it be labeled any differently than a negatively charged object?
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mfb
#2
Jan5-13, 04:11 PM
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A different charge density can lead to a voltage difference, but those values are not just proportional to each other - geometry of the charged materials matters, too.
If you remove electrons from an object, its potential increases.
Redbelly98
#3
Jan6-13, 07:49 AM
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Quote Quote by kjamha View Post
But I am wondering about an object that has a large deficit of electrons (positively charged). Does this object, just like the van de graaff, have a voltage associated with it?
Yes.
If so, would it be labeled any differently than a negatively charged object?
Yes. It's voltage would be labeled with a positive value; the negatively charged object is labeled with a negative value for voltage.

So in your original scenario (with an excess or overcrowding of electrons), the voltage would be -10,000 V (that's negative 10,000).


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