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Will free electrons experience its own electric/magnetic field?

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andrien
#19
Feb21-13, 08:04 AM
P: 1,020
https://pure.york.ac.uk/portal/files...loyds2012c.pdf
this is the full paper,he is talking.those vortex are defined by schrodinger wave function.I don't have time to talk about it.But this is different then what is understood in this thread.
Jano L.
#20
Feb21-13, 08:47 AM
PF Gold
P: 1,158
Then what I have come to conclude:
(1) I wrote down a Schrodinger/Dirac equation for a free electron and find the solution;
(2) I evaluated the electric and magnetic field from the solution;
(3) I should add the electric and magnetic field self-interaction back to the Hamiltonian although there is no external field or electron-electron interaction?
No, there is no need for that. You have to decide which situation you want to describe. If you have just one electron, free or in potential, there is no need to introduce self-action, because there is no experimental evidence for it, and it is also very difficult to make it exact and consistent with other things.

But if you have many electrons that interact, you can describe them effectively as one object, and then this composite object will always experience "self-interaction", due to mutual interaction of different electrons. For example, the current in the antenna feels radiation resistance, "self-force", and this can be explained as being due to mutual interaction between distinct electrons.
iaMikaruK
#21
Feb21-13, 09:00 AM
P: 11
Quote Quote by Jano L. View Post
No, there is no need for that. You have to decide which situation you want to describe. If you have just one electron, free or in potential, there is no need to introduce self-action, because there is no experimental evidence for it, and it is also very difficult to make it exact and consistent with other things.

But if you have many electrons that interact, you can describe them effectively as one object, and then this composite object will always experience "self-interaction", due to mutual interaction of different electrons. For example, the current in the antenna feels radiation resistance, "self-force", and this can be explained as being due to mutual interaction between distinct electrons.
Thank you for the reply.

Indeed, it is well accepted in the electron microscopy community as well as other society that the electron described here could be treated as a single electron and could be described by the Dirac equation or relativistic Schrodinger equation of free electrons (e.g. the references in my previous reply). Then I do not understand why the authors have include those terms in the Hamiltonian although they have excluded the electron-electron interactions. That's my question at the beginning.


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