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Quadroceptological, and quadraceptological

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Chi Meson
#1
Feb10-13, 08:41 PM
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Let it be known that my daughter, Nell, made this word up.

It has two spellings, quadroceptological, and quadraceptological. The authorities are now disputing the issue, and the form that is deemed to be spurious will be discarded. Nevertheless, when you google quadroceptological OR quadraceptological, you will now be forwarded to this thread.

The meaning is both obvious and unimportant.
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Chi Meson
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Feb10-13, 08:44 PM
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If anyone from the National Spelling Bee would like to buy rights to this word, contact me.

Otherwise, feel free to use this cromulent word.
zoobyshoe
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Feb10-13, 11:12 PM
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Quote Quote by Chi Meson View Post
The meaning is both obvious and unimportant.
This is a squigiferous comment and I think you are being stermitaceously croliscient.

Borek
#4
Feb11-13, 03:05 AM
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Quadroceptological, and quadraceptological

I thought official language of the PF is English.
zoobyshoe
#5
Feb11-13, 03:10 AM
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Quote Quote by Borek View Post
I thought official language of the PF is English.
English is a very fluid, rapidly-evolving, lemnolent language.
AlephZero
#6
Feb11-13, 04:43 AM
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I think body building is quadrocept-illogical.
Jimmy Snyder
#7
Feb11-13, 04:51 AM
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Quote Quote by Borek View Post
I thought official language of the PF is English.

The word English covers a wide range of sins.
Curious3141
#8
Feb11-13, 04:56 AM
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I find this entire thread execramonious and verboffusive.
Alfi
#9
Feb11-13, 11:07 AM
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The authorities are now disputing the issue,
Are they?
And who are they?
What possible dispute could they find?




curious minds need to know.
and require references to ... other people that are authorities.

lol j/k
TMO
#10
Feb11-13, 06:19 PM
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It's quadroceptological, and let me explain why.

Ancient Indo-European languages (such as Latin and Greek) have something called the thematic vowel, which is used to glue stems together, and in Proto-Indo-European, the value of the thematic vowel is either [e] or [o]. Thus, because [a] is not one of these values, it would leave only quadroceptological.
FlexGunship
#11
Feb13-13, 10:26 AM
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Quote Quote by Chi Meson View Post
[...] both obvious and unimportant.
I have a question regarding this word's use that fits this description.
Jimmy Snyder
#12
Feb13-13, 11:07 AM
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Quote Quote by TMO View Post
It's quadroceptological, and let me explain why.

Ancient Indo-European languages (such as Latin and Greek) have something called the thematic vowel, which is used to glue stems together, and in Proto-Indo-European, the value of the thematic vowel is either [e] or [o]. Thus, because [a] is not one of these values, it would leave only quadroceptological.
How does quadruped fit into that?
phion
#13
Feb13-13, 11:15 AM
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Look up "splenetic", I made that word.
TMO
#14
Feb23-13, 12:17 AM
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There's one mistake I made in my original post: the Greek thematic vowel is [o], but in Latin it's [i], so the correct classical compound would be quadriceptological.

Quote Quote by Jimmy Snyder View Post
How does quadruped fit into that?
Quadruped comes from the Latin quadrupes, which is a variant of quadripes, which is the correct Latin compound of quadr + pes. Sometimes languages have multiple variants of a word, and English, due to chance, picked an irregular variant.

Quote Quote by phion View Post
Look up "splenetic", I made that word.
The word "splenetic" comes from the Late Latin spleneticus, so it's highly unlikely (nevermind that we have an English document using "splenetic" which is from 1876, and one that uses "splenetik" which is from 1678).
FreeMitya
#15
Feb23-13, 01:09 AM
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This thread wouldn't be complete without this:



To address to the topic, it should be quadraceptological.

Upon further consideration, I've changed my mind.
Jimmy Snyder
#16
Feb23-13, 04:13 AM
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Quote Quote by TMO View Post
Ancient Indo-European languages (such as Latin and Greek) have something called the thematic vowel, which is used to glue stems together, and in Proto-Indo-European, the value of the thematic vowel is either [e] or [o]..
Quote Quote by TMO View Post
the Greek thematic vowel is [o], but in Latin it's [i].
But aren't Greek and Latin both Indo-European languages?


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