Integration & differentiation


by helenwang413
Tags: differentiation, integration
helenwang413
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#1
Dec2-06, 04:25 PM
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Under what condition can we change the order of integration and differentiation?

Thanks!
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courtrigrad
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#2
Dec2-06, 04:43 PM
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What do you mean by "change"?
marlon
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#3
Dec2-06, 05:00 PM
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Quote Quote by helenwang413 View Post
Under what condition can we change the order of integration and differentiation?

Thanks!
The order of integration can be changed always. If i remember correctly, that's one of the key requirements for an integral to exist.

Changing the order of integration is done to facilitate the actual integration, ie the integrand and the equation of the boundaries.

marlon

arildno
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#4
Dec3-06, 06:07 AM
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Integration & differentiation


Eeh, NO, marlon!

To take a trivial example, have a continuous, but non-differentiable integrand.
An anti-derivative of this function is certainly differentiable, and yields back the integrand, by FOTC.

However, since your integrand is non-differentiable, you cannot differentiate it first, and then compute that non-existent function's anti-derivative.

The upshot of this is that you may change the order of differentiation/integration as long as your integrand is sufficiently nice.
marlon
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Dec3-06, 07:13 AM
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Quote Quote by arildno View Post
Eeh, NO, marlon!

To take a trivial example, have a continuous, but non-differentiable integrand.
An anti-derivative of this function is certainly differentiable, and yields back the integrand, by FOTC.

However, since your integrand is non-differentiable, you cannot differentiate it first, and then compute that non-existent function's anti-derivative.

The upshot of this is that you may change the order of differentiation/integration as long as your integrand is sufficiently nice.
Oppps, thanks for the correction.

marlon
HallsofIvy
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#6
Dec3-06, 01:15 PM
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Libnitz's formula: If [itex]\phi (x,t)[/itex] is continuous in t and differentiable in x, then
[tex]\frac{d }{dx}\int_{\alpha (x)}^{\beta(x)} \phi(x,t)dt= \frac{d\alpha}{dx}\phi(x,\alpha(x))- \frac{d\beta}{dt}\phi(x,\beta(x))+ \int_{\alpha (x)}^{\beta(x)} \frac{\partial \phi}{\partial x} dt[/itex]
In particular, if the limits of integration are constant, then
[tex]\frac{d }{dx}\int_a^b \phi(x,t)dt= \int_a^b\frac{\partial \phi}{\partial x}dt[/tex]


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