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Machining cycle time

by rishi07
Tags: cycle, machining, time
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rishi07
#1
Dec11-07, 12:42 AM
P: 6
Please help me to calculate theoratical machining cycle time for the below mentioned operations:

1. Hobbing
2. Shaping
3. Shaving

I need variious calculations involed in determining the theoratical cycle time.
Please refer any website, if it can help me.

Thanks,
Rishi
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ank_gl
#2
Dec11-07, 01:32 AM
P: 735
dude you can find the required formulas in the text, or they can also be derived. they are pretty easy, i dunno where my stupid handbook is:((
FredGarvin
#3
Dec11-07, 05:43 AM
Sci Advisor
FredGarvin's Avatar
P: 5,095
Cycle times are going to be highly dependent on each particular part being machined at that time. What depth of cut? What length of cut? How many total operations?

I would recommend that you go to your school's library and start looking for manufacturing engineering books. Sometimes you have to crack a book open. Websites don't do it all.

TVP45
#4
Dec11-07, 07:56 AM
P: 1,127
Machining cycle time

Quote Quote by rishi07 View Post
Please help me to calculate theoratical machining cycle time for the below mentioned operations:

1. Hobbing
2. Shaping
3. Shaving

I need variious calculations involed in determining the theoratical cycle time.
Please refer any website, if it can help me.

Thanks,
Rishi
Any of these operations will be a function of feed speed and depth of cut, and those will be determined by the machine, the desired finish, the cutter shape and material, and the material. Ideally, you need about a two year apprenticeship in a machine shop to understand the questions, but you could start with The American Machinist's Handbook (which is out of print) or, alternatively, Machinery's Handbook.
rishi07
#5
Dec14-07, 03:39 AM
P: 6
thanks for your replies,
i knew that these terms require various input parameters to calculate the time.
But can't we still freeze all those parameters like depth of cut etc. to make a general
empirical formulae, in which putting all inputs will give a relevant theoratical time.

I've starting googling in manufacturing handbooks for different formulaes and cutting forces required to calculate time. Please help me in with the referance of some books, if someone have some good literature in soft stage.

Regards,

RiShI
TVP45
#6
Dec14-07, 06:36 AM
P: 1,127
Your question suggests you're new to machining, yet asks for "rules of thumb" that a senior manufacturing engineer might use. Is this just an exercise for a class or are you trying to do take-offs from prints?
ank_gl
#7
Dec14-07, 11:16 AM
P: 735
arent they just the emperical formulas in text anyways??
you put in all the inputs and get the machining time
TVP45
#8
Dec14-07, 12:09 PM
P: 1,127
Quote Quote by ank_gl View Post
arent they just the emperical formulas in text anyways??
you put in all the inputs and get the machining time
So, there are some empirical formulas out there and very senior manufacturing engineers use those as a starting point for setting up processes and estimating costs. Note that this would be practical only for high volume production, not for one-offs. Usually, there will be a pilot production run during which bugs will be worked out and a time-motion study done to calibrate the actual machining time.

Low volume stuff is usually done by a skilled estimator or machinist who uses the time of a previously machined similar piece as the basis for the estimate.

If you are in school (and I swear to the heavens that some schools now teach engineering without ever putting students into a shop), you may learn theoretical estimates. If you are in that boat, I suggest you get the ASM books for the metals you are interested in.
ank_gl
#9
Dec15-07, 10:12 AM
P: 735
Quote Quote by TVP45 View Post
If you are in school (and I swear to the heavens that some schools now teach engineering without ever putting students into a shop), you may learn theoretical estimates. If you are in that boat, I suggest you get the ASM books for the metals you are interested in.
yes, i am in school, but my school is good enough to put me in workshops for first 5 of my eight semester

Quote Quote by TVP45 View Post
there are some empirical formulas out there and very senior manufacturing engineers use those as a starting point
that is exactly what i meant, the empirical formula ARE used as a starting point and then it will be modified with various variable inputs, as some factors depend on the human part, so that part has to be optimized
rishi07
#10
Dec16-07, 10:30 PM
P: 6
well...to start with....i've some literature on simple turning as well as milling...
but i precisely mentioned to calculate times for hobbing, shaping and shaving operations.
mohsinkhalid
#11
Nov27-10, 03:47 AM
P: 5
Cycle times are going to be highly dependent on each particular part being machined at that time. What depth of cut? What length of cut? How many total operations?

I would recommend that you go to your school's library and start looking for manufacturing engineering books. Sometimes you have to crack a book open. Websites don't do it all.


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