Best Introduction to Calculus Book


by Mark
Tags: book, calculus, introduction
Mark
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#1
May28-04, 04:34 PM
P: 60
Hey, I know this is not on the level of the regular posts here, but I just want your opinions, on a good book to be introduced to calculus

In my science classes I have been continually been intrigued by many things (one of which, Maxwell's 4 equations). I ask questions, which results in..."this answer involves calculus"...And i am sick and tired of it. I am fairly good at math, but I have no idea where to start in this subject.

Can anyone recomend an introductory book for a grade 11 student who wants to start this..?
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jammieg
#2
May28-04, 07:20 PM
P: n/a
A good introduction is "Calculus made easy" by Silvanus P. Thomas and Martin Gardner St. Martin's Press, it's been around a long time and makes it fun to learn in my opinion.
fourier jr
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#3
May28-04, 07:34 PM
P: 943
Calculus: A Physical & Intuitive Approach - Morris Kline

Theelectricchild
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#4
May29-04, 03:06 AM
P: 258

Best Introduction to Calculus Book


DIv grad curl and all that.
fourier jr
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#5
May29-04, 11:41 AM
P: 943
Quote Quote by Theelectricchild
DIv grad curl and all that.

for grade 11? that book is good but not for someone who hasn't seen any calculus before.
fishys182
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#6
May29-04, 01:09 PM
P: 35
what ever you do.. DO NOT get this book... it did not explain things well AT ALL. this was a college book, but yeah.. still not recommending it. it did not explain things well.. i was very dissappointed.. i wanted to keep a calculus book... the thing was 100 bucks.. but i decided to sell it back at the end of the term b/c i mostly learned from going in to talk to the professor then that book. evil evil book
Calculus, Single Variable
By Deborah Hughes-Hallett, Andrew M. Gleason, Daniel E. Flath, Patti Frazer Lock, Sheldon P. Gordon, David O. Lomen, David Lovelock, Brad G. Osgood, William G. McCallum, Andrew Pasquale
Release Date: 06 July, 2001
Mark
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#7
May29-04, 01:55 PM
P: 60
Alright, my library has...
  • Calculus Made Easy
  • Div grad curl and all that

I also have yet to take a senior algebra course (3d vectors, matrix, proofs, etc.) how complicated is div grad curl and all that stuff?

Also..
How long do you think a book has to be, to give a decent explanation of calculus, Calculus:Intuitive and physical approach is over 900 pages...
In the other post the people are talking about Calc I, and Calc II, etc. to these books all only cover Calc I? or more..?

Thankyou so much for your suggestions so far, any other books?
fourier jr
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#8
May29-04, 02:01 PM
P: 943
Don't bother with Div Grad Curl & All That, it's for people who are in their 3rd calculus course. I like the one by Morris Kline.
Math Is Hard
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#9
May29-04, 03:19 PM
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Hi Mark,
My favorite "companion" book for a first calculus course is "How to Ace Calculus" (Streetwise Guide). It's fun to read and does a great job explaining concepts at an overview level - sometimes the textbooks are so detailed that you can lose sight of what you're trying to solve.
Anyhoo, you might want to check it out when start your calc studies.
p.s. I actually did "Ace" Calculus
Theelectricchild
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#10
May29-04, 05:41 PM
P: 258
Teeehehhehe I was kidding about Div Grad Curl and all that--- I am taking vector calc and I have trouble with that book.
QuantumDefect
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#11
May29-04, 08:54 PM
P: 62
I always thought that An Idiots Guide to Calculus was good.
Math Is Hard
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#12
May29-04, 09:52 PM
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Don't forget Calculus For Blondes
fourier jr
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#13
May29-04, 10:14 PM
P: 943
Quote Quote by Theelectricchild
Teeehehhehe I was kidding about Div Grad Curl and all that--- I am taking vector calc and I have trouble with that book.
It was written by a physicist so maybe it would be better for a physics or engineering student? I thought it was good because I do better with intuitive explanations. Not everybody does though.

Quote Quote by Mark
How long do you think a book has to be, to give a decent explanation of calculus, Calculus:Intuitive and physical approach is over 900 pages...
In the other post the people are talking about Calc I, and Calc II, etc. to these books all only cover Calc I? or more..?
I just have a thing for big huge math books I guess. Either big huge ones or tiny little ones. Example: my favourite math history book is also by Kline; it's 1300 pages. His calculus book covers single- and multivariable calculus, infinite series, polar coordinates, etc so I guess that would be all of calc I & calc II. He's also got a 1-chapter intro to differential equations at the end. It's so long because he's got so much explanation and discussion.
Theelectricchild
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#14
May30-04, 01:44 AM
P: 258
But seriously--- I thought that James Stewart Calculus Early Transcendentals was an excellent text book.... 4th or 5th edition it doesnt matter!!! CHeck it out if you can!
franznietzsche
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#15
May30-04, 10:48 AM
P: 1,782
Calculus of a SIngle Variable
Larson, Hostetler, Edwards

Its the one i first learned from freshamn year, very good. It has a nice format to it makes it easy to follow.
Theelectricchild
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#16
Jun1-04, 01:42 AM
P: 258
^^^

Ahh the book i used in high school! Excellent indeed, although I personally thought that going into series calculus (ch8) immediately after integration (ch7) was a bit of a jump, but other than that it was excellent.
Jdo300
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#17
Jun1-04, 12:45 PM
P: 545
Quote Quote by Mark
Hey, I know this is not on the level of the regular posts here, but I just want your opinions, on a good book to be introduced to calculus

In my science classes I have been continually been intrigued by many things (one of which, Maxwell's 4 equations). I ask questions, which results in..."this answer involves calculus"...And i am sick and tired of it. I am fairly good at math, but I have no idea where to start in this subject.

Can anyone recomend an introductory book for a grade 11 student who wants to start this..?
Hi Mark,

I'm glad you posted this, I'm also in the 11th grade (just finished pre calc) and I was going to ask the same question. Thanks everyone for all the suggestions
Gza
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#18
Jun2-04, 04:13 PM
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P: 525
Okay, I know all the hardcore math heads would tend to disagree with me on this, but I would say that stewarts calculus concepts and contexts book is excellent. There aren't a lot of proofs, but the book really helps a beginner start using calculus, and understanding it before getting to the nitty gritty. A few people I know have trudged all the way through Apostle's tome, and found they had to skip over entire sections reverting to stewarts book to tell them what the hell is going on intuitively. Plus another thing I like about stewarts is that if you're a nerd like me, not having the proofs allows you to derive them yourself, and then check either at the back of the book or another reference to verify your result. This has gone a long way in deepening my understanding of calculus. Hope that helps!


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