Register to reply

Finding Incident Intensity for Unpolarized Light

by wiped_out
Tags: incident, intensity, light, unpolarized
Share this thread:
wiped_out
#1
Sep8-09, 02:46 AM
P: 2
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
Two sheets of Polaroid are placed on top of each other with an angle φ between their pass
directions. Calculate be the ratio of transmitted to incident intensity for initially unpolarised
light if φ = 30.


I copied the question exactly, I'm pretty sure that typo wasn't on purpose but I left it there anyway.

2. Relevant equations

I0 = I'/2

Malus's Law
I = I0 cos^2 θ

3. The attempt at a solution

I used the equation above to do:

= I0 cos^2(30)
cos^2(30)=.75
.75 x .75 = .5625 = 9/16
= I0(9/16)

not sure if that is right
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Fungus deadly to AIDS patients found to grow on trees
Canola genome sequence reveals evolutionary 'love triangle'
Scientists uncover clues to role of magnetism in iron-based superconductors
rl.bhat
#2
Sep8-09, 05:35 AM
HW Helper
P: 4,433
When the unpolarised light is transmitted through a Polaroid, 50% of light is transmitted. So I' = Io/2
When it passes through second Polaroid, the intensity of transmitted light is
I" = Io/2*cos^2(θ)


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Unpolarized Light Intensity Introductory Physics Homework 3
Intensity of the incident light Introductory Physics Homework 1
What is the intensity of the incident of light? Introductory Physics Homework 1
Incident Intensity of light transmitted Introductory Physics Homework 4
Finding the wave length incident light troubles! wee! Introductory Physics Homework 0