Velocity from Kinetic energy and work energy theorem


by IAmSparticus
Tags: energy, kinetic, theorem, velocity, work
IAmSparticus
IAmSparticus is offline
#1
Oct17-09, 12:39 AM
P: 36
1. A 0.066 kg arrow is fired horizontally. The bowstring exerts an average force of 50 N on the arrow over a distance of 0.95 m. With what speed does the arrow leave the bow?


2. Work Energy Theorem = change in kinetic energy = (1/2*mass*Final Velocity^2)-(1/2*mass*Initial Velocity^2)



3. Since the initial speed is zero and the mass is given, I get a solution of 0, but that is most likely because I did the algebra wrong. I got an equation of Final Velocity = Square root (2*.066kg*0m/s)/(2*.066)

Which is clearly wrong. Where did I go wrong?
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rl.bhat
rl.bhat is offline
#2
Oct17-09, 01:37 AM
HW Helper
P: 4,439
What is the work done on the arrow?
Equate it to the kinetic energy of the arrow and find the velocity.


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