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Books for beginning to learn Pure Mathematics

by Jarbear
Tags: beginning, books, learn, mathematics, pure
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Jarbear
#1
Mar3-10, 09:25 PM
P: 3
For a while now I have been looking for a series of texts that I can read in order to learn some of the basics of abstract/pure mathematics. I am currently taking Calculus II with Stewart's book as my text, and this summer I plan on going through Spivak's Calculus.

I have finished my universities Linear Algebra 1 but I do not feel satisfied with the understanding I left with ( the class was a bit "light" but also me neglecting the need for a true understanding didn't help ). I would like to work through Linear Algebra Done Right by Sheldon Axler also.

I need help developing my skills at constructing proofs before I start Spivak's book. Before I do that though I would like to get some other books under my belt.

Right now I am looking at:

A Concise Introduction to Pure Mathematics - Martin Liebeck
http://www.amazon.ca/Concise-Introdu.../dp/1584881933

It is meets all my criteria for what I want except there is no solution manual to be found, this is a problem as I am going to be self-studying. I have only read a bit of it and it seems alright, besides the constant uncertainty when I solve a problem.

Another book I have been looking at is
Chapter Zero : Fundamental Notions of Abstract Mathematics - Carol Schumacher
http://www.amazon.ca/Chapter-Zero-Fu...7672494&sr=1-1

It seems like a bit much for me to jump into though I think I could handle it if I gave it some time. A instructor at my university has a set of lecture notes that "sort of" accompany it, so that might help. I can not seem to find a solution manual to this also, another problem.

A book on Proofs I have been looking at is :

The Nuts and Bolts of Proofs - Antonella Cupillari
http://www.amazon.ca/Nuts-Bolts-Proo...7672612&sr=1-1

This book seems pretty good but I would like to do/read a bit more set theory and logic before starting it. Although it does seem manageable. It has detailed solutions in the book itself, which is a large plus.

This also seems to be along the lines of what I am looking for :

How to Prove It: A Structured Approach

http://www.amazon.ca/How-Prove-Struc...7672716&sr=1-1

I have yet to actually hold the book and look through it, I am also unsure if there are solutions out there for it.


I would really appreciate suggestions on books that encompass my current interests anything that will help me get started with pure mathematics. Specifically develop my skills at writing proofs, and obviously some of the prerequisite fundamentals needed to write them.

My current pre-occupation with desiring ( needing?) a solution manual for "security" may be holding me back, but any texts you could recommend would be greatly appreciated.
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nicksauce
#2
Mar4-10, 10:24 AM
Sci Advisor
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P: 1,275
Not sure about the others, but "How to prove it" is a wonderful book. I don't know if there is a solution manual, but I think there are enough examples in the book to get the point through.
qspeechc
#3
Mar4-10, 11:19 AM
P: 792
Velleman's book is good, but I often found it slow when I was trying to learn how to do proofs. Therefore I recommend complementing it with a nippier book like this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Abstract-Mathe..._ep_dpt_6#noop


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