logarithmic decrement


by Jamin2112
Tags: decrement, logarithmic
Jamin2112
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#1
May2-10, 11:11 PM
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1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

Basically, I have LQ''(t) + RQ'(t) + (1/C)Q(t)=0, and I'm supposed to

"Show that the ration of the charge Q between two successive maxima is given by exp(RTd/2L), where Td is the time between two successive maxima. The natural logarithm of this ration is called the logarithmic decrement.


2. Relevant equations

Dunno

3. The attempt at a solution

So I got a solution Q(t)=e(-Rt)/(2L) [ C1cos( (√(R2-4L/C) )/(2L)t) + C2sin( (√(R2-4L/C) )/(2L)t).

But I can't figure out how to find Td. I mean, I could always find t when dQ/dt=0; but then I'd have to plug two values of t back into Q(t) and find the difference, and ............ So what's the right way to do this?
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lanedance
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#2
May2-10, 11:49 PM
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First notice the sin & cos terms have the same argument & the choice of c1 & c2 will just choose an overall phase. So for this argument set c2 = 0.

Then the maxima will just be where cos is maximum and successive maxima will occur where the argument of cos has changed by 2pi
LCKurtz
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#3
May3-10, 12:01 AM
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Thanks
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Quote Quote by lanedance View Post
First notice the sin & cos terms have the same argument & the choice of c1 & c2 will just choose an overall phase. So for this argument set c2 = 0.

Then the maxima will just be where cos is maximum and successive maxima will occur where the argument of cos has changed by 2pi
Not exactly. The max's don't agree with the max's of the cosine, but the right idea. To the OP, just look at e-btcos(at+c).

lanedance
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#4
May3-10, 12:15 AM
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logarithmic decrement


good pickup thanks - They will be pretty close when the natural frequency is much larger that the decay constant, but you do need to take the exponential into account


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