Register to reply

The dynamic heat transfer in tube wall

by law&theorem
Tags: dynamic, heat, transfer, tube, wall
Share this thread:
law&theorem
#1
Jun29-11, 07:52 AM
P: 29
When I read some heat transfer book, I got a problem.
There are some numerical calculation methods in dynamic heat conducting in tube wall, but all the methods assume the temperature on one side of the tube and then calculate the temperature distributed in the wall.
But are there some methods assume that temperature on inner/outer sides both changes and then calculate the temperature in the wall ????
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
'Smart material' chin strap harvests energy from chewing
King Richard III died painfully on battlefield
Capturing ancient Maya sites from both a rat's and a 'bat's eye view'
Astronuc
#2
Jun29-11, 08:01 AM
Admin
Astronuc's Avatar
P: 21,911
Quote Quote by law&theorem View Post
When I read some heat transfer book, I got a problem.
There are some numerical calculation methods in dynamic heat conducting in tube wall, but all the methods assume the temperature on one side of the tube and then calculate the temperature distributed in the wall.
But are there some methods assume that temperature on inner/outer sides both changes and then calculate the temperature in the wall ????
Sure, it's a matter of transient heat conduction. One has to be familiar with the forms of the steady-state and transient heat conduction equation, or systems of equations for heat transfer.

Normally in calculating temperature through a wall, on starts at the boundary condition and works toward the hottest temperature or axis/plane of symmetry.

Many systems are designed for steady-state, while others may be subject to slow time-varying boundary conditions. In off-normal conditions, the boundary condition may change rapidly with time.

Simulating transients, particularly rapid transients, requires finer time steps (and usually explicit (dynamic) vs implicit (static/quasi-static) numercial solutions). It is also an art.
law&theorem
#3
Jun29-11, 08:16 AM
P: 29
Quote Quote by Astronuc View Post
Sure, it's a matter of transient heat conduction. One has to be familiar with the forms of the steady-state and transient heat conduction equation, or systems of equations for heat transfer.

Normally in calculating temperature through a wall, on starts at the boundary condition and works toward the hottest temperature or axis/plane of symmetry.

Many systems are designed for steady-state, while others may be subject to slow time-varying boundary conditions. In off-normal conditions, the boundary condition may change rapidly with time.

Simulating transients, particularly rapid transients, requires finer time steps (and usually explicit (dynamic) vs implicit (static/quasi-static) numercial solutions). It is also an art.
Finer time steps, maybe, I'll try

mruiwl
#4
Jul4-12, 10:13 AM
P: 2
The dynamic heat transfer in tube wall

shouldn't this be done by using integration???
law&theorem
#5
Jul4-12, 10:13 PM
P: 29
Yes, finer time step and interation
mruiwl
#6
Jul5-12, 12:43 AM
P: 2
do you have the formula?


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Plane Wall Heat transfer Classical Physics 5
Heat Transfer from Air to Dynamic Fluid in Pipe General Engineering 1
Radiation heat transfer between air or wall General Physics 6
Heat Transfer from metal wall Engineering, Comp Sci, & Technology Homework 0