Register to reply

Lie path dependent factor

by lennyleonard
Tags: dependent, factor, path
Share this thread:
lennyleonard
#1
Jul9-11, 01:53 PM
P: 24
Hi everyone!!

I can't figure out why electromagnetism is defined a non integrable phase factor (or path dependent), referring to the element of the Lie group U1 to which it (the phase factor) belongs.

Why it's said to be non-integrable? And, precisely, how do we specify a path for the [itex]e^{\theta}[/itex] ?
By parametrizing a path with respect to [itex]\theta[/itex]?


Thanks!!
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Flapping baby birds give clues to origin of flight
Prions can trigger 'stuck' wine fermentations, researchers find
Socially-assistive robots help kids with autism learn by providing personalized prompts
phinds
#2
Jul9-11, 05:41 PM
PF Gold
phinds's Avatar
P: 6,332
double posts are against the rules here. I suggest you delete one of them lest you annoy the mods.
lennyleonard
#3
Jul11-11, 04:07 PM
P: 24
You are absolutely right Phinds!!
The truth is i've posted this in the algebra section but then i realized that this was the best section to post in.

If tou tell me how to delete a post i'll be glad to do that.

Sorry for the issue!

phinds
#4
Jul11-11, 04:25 PM
PF Gold
phinds's Avatar
P: 6,332
Lie path dependent factor

Quote Quote by lennyleonard View Post
You are absolutely right Phinds!!
The truth is i've posted this in the algebra section but then i realized that this was the best section to post in.

If tou tell me how to delete a post i'll be glad to do that.

Sorry for the issue!
Hm ... I thought there was a way, but I can't find it. You can always ask a mod to delete one for you I guess.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Factor a in Van der Waals equation of state off by a factor of 0.1? Classical Physics 0
Path connectedness of union of path connected spaces Calculus & Beyond Homework 0
Differential Equation - Path of Dog Chasing a Rabbit running in a curved path Calculus & Beyond Homework 2
Utility of Form factor and Crest factor in an AC waverform Classical Physics 2