Help me understand Electro-induction


by LiteHacker
Tags: electroinduction
LiteHacker
LiteHacker is offline
#1
Nov8-12, 07:48 AM
P: 18
Imagine you have a cylindrical dielectric charged with 100KV on one end and -100KV on the other end.

Now take an uncharged metal ball and bring it close to the positive end of the dielectric.

From what I understand, the metal ball will be induced into having a charge that will come close to -100KV, depending on how close it comes to the dielectric, via Electrostatic Induction.

When this is done, is there any transfer of energy? Does the dielectric change in any way? If so, in what way?
I can't find any equations that characterized the change in charged matter, or the change in uncharged matter..
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mfb
mfb is offline
#2
Nov8-12, 08:23 AM
Mentor
P: 10,836
From what I understand, the metal ball will be induced into having a charge that will come close to -100KV
Charge is not induction. The metal ball will not get a net charge (unless it has contact to something else) - it will have some charge separation, with less electrons close to the -100kV-point and more electrons far away.

Why do you use a cylindrical dielectric? Two charged objects (conductivity does not matter) would do the same.

When this is done, is there any transfer of energy?
Some energy of the electrostatic field is used to separate the charges.


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