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Normal and Friction Force Relationships went turning curbs

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daniel.j
#1
Nov14-12, 09:38 PM
P: 3
how can you tell if the frictional force is great enough to keep a car turning a curb in circular motion based on the coefficient of friction and the normal force?
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haruspex
#2
Nov14-12, 09:50 PM
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If a vehicle of mass m turns a corner radius r at speed v, what is its acceleration? What force is needed to provide that acceleration? Where will that force come from?
daniel.j
#3
Nov14-12, 09:55 PM
P: 3
Acceleration: 0.173 m/s/s
Force is coming from engine but the street is wet with oil.

daniel.j
#4
Nov14-12, 10:00 PM
P: 3
Normal and Friction Force Relationships went turning curbs

A car with a velocity of 15.3 m/s follows a circular road that has a radius of 40 m. The car has a mass 1350 kg. The pavement is wet and oily so the coefficient o friction between the tires and the road is only .500. The frictionall force that I calculated came out to be 6620 Newtons. Is this frictional force large enough to maintain the car in circular motion?
haruspex
#5
Nov15-12, 03:08 PM
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Quote Quote by daniel.j View Post
A car with a velocity of 15.3 m/s follows a circular road that has a radius of 40 m. The car has a mass 1350 kg. The pavement is wet and oily so the coefficient o friction between the tires and the road is only .500. The frictionall force that I calculated came out to be 6620 Newtons. Is this frictional force large enough to maintain the car in circular motion?
Please don't just tell me numbers. To figure out what you're doing I then I have reverse engineer the calculations. Let's just work with the algebra until we agree the equations.
A car mass M turns a corner radius R at constant speed V. What is its acceleration (magnitude and direction)? What force will provide that acceleration (and no, it's not the engine)? How large is the force? What limit on the size of the force might mean it is not large enough to turn the corner?


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