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Particle accelerator

by JackRohr
Tags: accelerator, particle
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JackRohr
#1
Feb11-13, 10:28 AM
P: 6
I am looking to making a particle accelerator but I don't understand how to make a vacuums. Wouldn't sucking out all the air make the pressure inside very extreme crushing the container? Also how would providing magnetism move them? Would you have to angle the magnets to "direct" the particle?
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JackRohr
#2
Feb11-13, 10:33 AM
P: 6
Lastly since atoms seem to fade in and out of our dimension how could this work? Even if the force is constant wouldn't the actual force on it not be?
phinds
#3
Feb11-13, 10:44 AM
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Quote Quote by JackRohr View Post
I am looking to making a particle accelerator but I don't understand how to make a vacuums. Wouldn't sucking out all the air make the pressure inside very extreme crushing the container? Also how would providing magnetism move them? Would you have to angle the magnets to "direct" the particle?
Building a particle accelerator is not a job for an amatuer and you are clearly an amatuer. You will find several LOCKED threads on this forum about this. They are locked because it is dangerous.

Quote Quote by JackRohr View Post
Lastly since atoms seem to fade in and out of our dimension how could this work? Even if the force is constant wouldn't the actual force on it not be?
What do you mean "our dimension" ? There is no evidence of any dimension OTHER than ours so this seems to be a meaningless question.

JackRohr
#4
Feb11-13, 10:52 AM
P: 6
Particle accelerator

I have read into this subject and I do believe I am not an "armature". Everyone started off as an armature at one point though. Just because I focus on other things then making my posts seem "smart" or well versed in the subject does not mean I am not. I just want to get my point across to the point where everyone can understand it and give me feedback. When you get into Metaphysics it shows how particles do seem to "fade" in and out of our view giving us the idea that it does go to other dimensions. I know this is a big project to take on but I believe I can do it. If not what is something else I could look into doing?
danR
#5
Feb11-13, 11:01 AM
P: 351
Quote Quote by phinds View Post
Building a particle accelerator is not a job for an amatuer and you are clearly an amatuer. You will find several LOCKED threads on this forum about this. They are locked because it is dangerous.
I like to see a link to news stories or stats on amateurs being injured building particle accelerators. Do they have to pay higher insurance?
Nugatory
#6
Feb11-13, 11:04 AM
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Quote Quote by JackRohr View Post
Lastly since atoms seem to fade in and out of our dimension how could this work? Even if the force is constant wouldn't the actual force on it not be?
Well, particle accelerators have been built and work just fine.... So something is wrong with your thinking somewhere. In this case, it's the claim that atoms "fade in and out of our dimension" - they do no such thing.
Nugatory
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Feb11-13, 11:07 AM
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Quote Quote by danR View Post
I like to see a link to news stories or stats on amateurs being injured building particle accelerators. Do they have to pay higher insurance?
You won't see a lot of news stories on amateurs being injured or killed doing their own open-heart surgery either... Doesn't mean it's either safe or within the reach of an amateur.
ZapperZ
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Feb11-13, 11:07 AM
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Please note that, for future reference, the field of accelerator physics is more of a classical physics topic than anything else. It is not night energy physics, and it isn't a quantum physics topic. One deals more in classical E&M than any other topic.

Secondly ,atoms do not fade on and out of our dimensions.

Thirdly, if you cannot get ahold of a simple CRT tube to use as your "particle accelerator" there is a very good chance that you will have even more trouble acquiring metallic vacuum systems and the appropriate vacuum pumps to construct an accelerator. I strongly suggest you do a search of PF first and see what had already been discussed.

Zz.
phinds
#9
Feb11-13, 11:09 AM
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Quote Quote by JackRohr View Post
I am looking to making a particle accelerator but I don't understand how to make a vacuums. Wouldn't sucking out all the air make the pressure inside very extreme crushing the container? Also how would providing magnetism move them? Would you have to angle the magnets to "direct" the particle?
Everything about these questions mark you as an amateur.

I mean you no disrespect, but you clearly have EXTREMELY limited knowledge of physics and building a particle accelerator is quite a complex project. I suggest you study physics for a while before you take it on.
JackRohr
#10
Feb11-13, 11:15 AM
P: 6
I would not be surprised if my thinking is flawed. I have many times tried things that have not worked out and ideas that have not made sense when looking back on them such as everyone has. I assumed that particles fade in and out because there electrons seem to. They go from an observable state to one where we can not detect them.
ZapperZ
#11
Feb11-13, 11:21 AM
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Quote Quote by JackRohr View Post
I would not be surprised if my thinking is flawed. I have many times tried things that have not worked out and ideas that have not made sense when looking back on them such as everyone has. I assumed that particles fade in and out because there electrons seem to. They go from an observable state to one where we can not detect them.
No. You have a severe misunderstanding of quantum mechanics.

We strongly suggest that you stick to one topic at a time. If you wish to learn how particle accelerators are constructed, stick to that. Do not littered that by including off-the-cuff remarks on something else, especially when you have a faulty understanding of it. You could easily make an erroneous and speculative post in violation of the PF Rules that you had agreed to.

Zz
danR
#12
Feb11-13, 12:13 PM
P: 351
I think you want to make a cyclotron. There used to be old-timey science projects in Scientific American ("The Amateur Scientist" section). But they require a level of shop-skills that just don't exist anymore. If you know how to use tools, you know there are risks involved just getting such a device built, and functioning properly, and that there are various risks operating it.

You cannot build a high-vacuum primary pump yourself, let alone the ultra-high vacuum pump, needed for an accelerator, I'm sure; and I don't know if any company is going to sell you such equipment.
JackRohr
#13
Feb11-13, 02:15 PM
P: 6
I understand I may not be ready for this. I asked if anyone ad other ideas and I never got a response. Other ideas?
ZapperZ
#14
Feb11-13, 02:34 PM
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Did you miss the part when I mentioned about the vacuum CRT?

Zz.
JackRohr
#15
Feb11-13, 03:52 PM
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What does not being able to acquire that (in your opnion) have to do with other ideas?
Integral
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Feb11-13, 05:09 PM
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Quote Quote by JackRohr View Post
What does not being able to acquire that (in your opnion) have to do with other ideas?
Because it IS a particle accelerator.
Vanadium 50
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Feb11-13, 08:59 PM
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I think we're done here. This is a dangerous activity, and we don't discuss those here.


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