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Dec1-08, 04:40 PM
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Alfred Nobel Symposium (2005)
Energy in Cosmos, Molecules and Life

The Alfred Nobel Symposium Energy in Cosmos, Molecules and Life, held in June 2005, was the first Nobel Symposium that brought together scientists representing all three scientific categories of the Nobel Prize: Physics, Chemistry and Medicine. The overall themes of the symposium were: energy in a cosmological perspective; the energy flow as a driving force for life and evolution; the taming of energy sources in the service of society; and future energy sources.

The aim of the symposium was to create conditions for exchange and interaction, partly between the different disciplines and partly between promising younger researchers and the world's leading scientists.

According to the participants, these intentions were indeed fulfilled during the five days of the symposium. After the concluding open session in Aula Magna, Stockholm University, Professors Kandel, Zare and Luther summarized the symposium as a brave experiment by the Nobel Foundation, where outstanding spokesmen from the most different scientific disciplines had been invited. This gave the participants the rare opportunity of meeting over the boundaries of the different scientific disciplines, and the possibility of finding a common language to discuss energy issues from various perspectives.

. . . .
http://energy.nobelprize.org/lectures.html

Session I: Origin of non-equilibrium universe, dark matter and dark energy

Session II: Chemical reactions, energy transfer and catalysis (part 1)

Session III: Biological energy and molecular motors

Session IV: Energy and evolution of man

Session V: Chemical reactions, energy transfer and catalysis (part 2)

Session VI: Central nervous system, brain and information

Session VII: Future sources of energy

Enjoy!
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