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jinksys
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Aug29-09, 03:01 PM
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I'm reading Concepts of Modern Physics by Beiser, and the chapter example says:

A spacecraft is moving relative to earth. An observer finds that in one hour, according to her clock 3601s elapse on the spacecraft's clock. What is the craft's velocity relative to earth? (This is not a homework question, I can get the correct answer.)

So is this saying that for every 3600 seconds on earth, the spacecraft's clock moves 3601 seconds? Wouldn't this mean that time runs faster on the craft and not slower?
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