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twofish-quant
twofish-quant is offline
#61
Jan20-12, 03:17 AM
P: 6,863
Quote Quote by pmghss View Post
There is no 100% proof of evidence the Big Bang even happened!
There's what I consider 99.9% evidence in that we can see the big bang. Trying to argue that the big bang didn't happen to most astrophysicists is like trying to argue that the sun and moon don't exist. I see this big glowing thing in the sky, and I see the this big round thing at night.

Similarly, I see this big glowing thing in microwaves that in all directions.

Everything we have witnessed in the universe "so far" has obeyed the laws of physics. And yet when it comes to the (so called beginning of the) universe itself, the realm of supernatural and fantasy seem to invade thought.
There is a reason for that. If you extrapolate to t=0, then the "laws of physics" don't work, so you have to make up something weird.

To answer your question - What we see as the observable "universe" may only be because our technology can only see that far. If there are blobs of matter that are 100s of billions or even trillions of light years away, we may not be able to see them........... yet.
We can't see them at all. If you look at 13 billion light years, you see the big bang. You can't see any further back than the big bang. We know the universe is finite in time, because we can see the end of the universe so to speak.

It's also not a technology issue. If you do galaxy counts, you'll find that the number of galaxies start going down well, well before the detection limits.

The clues we have, CBR, point to "some" kind of event that happened to spread the cosmic background radiation throuout the universe. Hubble's Law points to "some" event that led to objects speeding away from one another. For some reason, these points were taken to the extreme to invent the Big Bang theory and everything starting from a dot. pfft!
Well no.....

The current models don't say what happens at t=0. The backward guess ends at about t=10^(-52) seconds.