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J Crombie
#1
Feb9-12, 05:39 AM
P: 1
Watched an episode of Brian Greenes NOVA "The Fabric of the Universe" for the 300th time and an episode of "The Universe" about M Theory and Parallel Universes. A thought/question popped into my head based on my uneducated understanding of these concepts (I was an Econ Major).

* Quantum mechanics tells us that subatomic particles constantly pop in and out of our existance and exist in multiple places at the same time.

Question - Do I understand correctly that M Theory hypothesizes that extra dimensions explain this? That the particles are simply traveling between these dimensions in the same way it tries to explain the weakness of gravity?

My Point - If an infinite number of parallel universes actually exist then the existence of enormously advanced intelligent life is certain. Some of them would have to be sending us communications (every scenario must exist somewhere in infinity). The most obvious place to look for a message is in the stuff we share with them, particles... Right? So if that version of M Theory is accurate (I realize that's a big if) then there must be messages buried somewhere in subatomic particles and we simply have not advanced enough to discover them yet. On the flip side... if there are no messages then that form of M Theory is impossible.

Either way I feel like we have a better chance of discovery there (regardless of how improbable infinite connected universes may be) vs. using telescopes hoping to stumble on another inteligent life form that happens to use light waves to communicate the same way we do and is located within 50 thousand light years of earth where they could possibly see (using light waves) that our planet was developing intelligent life.

I am sure that almost anyone who frequents this site is capable of shooting this idea down with a pellet gun but I would be interested in knowing.
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