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Hubbles law and Relativity

by .ultimate
Tags: hubbles, relativity
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.ultimate
#1
Mar22-07, 01:10 AM
P: 45
According to Hubble's law, Velocity of recession of galaxies is directily proportinal to distance between them

ie v=H0.r

But, according to theory of relativity

Time diliation

t=t0.(underoot 1-v^2/c^2)

as v->c

t=0

That means the universe will expand upto a certain distance ( if the law hold correct) i.e 2.10^10 l.y

After that the galaxies will slow down to the observer

as
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anantchowdhary
#2
Mar22-07, 01:32 AM
P: 372
Quote Quote by .ultimate View Post
But, according to theory of relativity

Time diliation

t=t0.(underoot 1-v^2/c^2)

as v->c

t=0
Here i dont think its possible that [tex]v>c[/tex].Also if it were to be so you would get [tex]\gamma [/tex] as a complex number!
.ultimate
#3
Mar22-07, 06:57 AM
P: 45
I meant as v is almost equal to speed of light, will the recession of galaxies slow down? because t~0


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