Hubbles law and Relativity


by .ultimate
Tags: hubbles, relativity
.ultimate
.ultimate is offline
#1
Mar22-07, 01:10 AM
P: 45
According to Hubble's law, Velocity of recession of galaxies is directily proportinal to distance between them

ie v=H0.r

But, according to theory of relativity

Time diliation

t=t0.(underoot 1-v^2/c^2)

as v->c

t=0

That means the universe will expand upto a certain distance ( if the law hold correct) i.e 2.10^10 l.y

After that the galaxies will slow down to the observer

as
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Cougars' diverse diet helped them survive the Pleistocene mass extinction
Cyber risks can cause disruption on scale of 2008 crisis, study says
Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes
anantchowdhary
anantchowdhary is offline
#2
Mar22-07, 01:32 AM
P: 372
Quote Quote by .ultimate View Post
But, according to theory of relativity

Time diliation

t=t0.(underoot 1-v^2/c^2)

as v->c

t=0
Here i dont think its possible that [tex]v>c[/tex].Also if it were to be so you would get [tex]\gamma [/tex] as a complex number!
.ultimate
.ultimate is offline
#3
Mar22-07, 06:57 AM
P: 45
I meant as v is almost equal to speed of light, will the recession of galaxies slow down? because t~0


Register to reply

Related Discussions
How much is Special Relativity a needed foundation of General Relativity Special & General Relativity 97
Doppler-shift/hubbles-law implies big bang/universe age? Special & General Relativity 11
Hubbles Law violates c? Special & General Relativity 3
Hubbles Law Introductory Physics Homework 5