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Is AstroPhysics risky for career?

by SuperStringboy
Tags: astrophysics, career, risky
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SuperStringboy
#19
Nov4-07, 10:56 AM
P: 75
when was writing the last post two more reviews came. Locrian, Laura,wildman and all have some positive and negetive opinions. At first sometimes i was being happy sometimes scared. Now really enjoying this.More discussion should be go on and we should clear it.

In a article of Mishio kaku he said that now there is a job problem because of old scientists who are called the sputnic group or something like that. In few years they will start to retire. Then for our generation it should be easier to make a good career with astrophysics.
SuperStringboy
#20
Nov4-07, 11:04 AM
P: 75
Quote Quote by Laura1013 View Post
Yes, but as with theoretical astrophysics in general, the number of positions is very small.

I'm a little confused. You've completed one year at a university, is that correct? How do you know enough physics to form a new, publishable particle physics theory?
Yes the information is correct. Only first year. I have have a sell phone. Last year almost always i used it like a palmtop. I took it everywhere and read articles from internet. I have read everything what i like. Even i have given lot of time to understand theories like RS(Randal Sandrum) models I and II. I need two understand the equation.So i am lagging behind because of mathematics.And i am not telling my idea will be true. I will have to do this after few yrs. Just thinking about it. I know nothing of physics now .So my idea is still Philosophy , i have to make it physics.

I think now i should concentrate on my result.If i don't do it then i will have to do the job what einstein did. Nasa is far far away....
Locrian
#21
Nov4-07, 01:09 PM
P: 1,745
Quote Quote by SuperStringboy View Post
In a article of Mishio kaku he said that now there is a job problem because of old scientists who are called the sputnic group or something like that. In few years they will start to retire. Then for our generation it should be easier to make a good career with astrophysics.
Well, it is true the baby boomers will be retiring soon, but how soon is very much in question. More importantly, there's plenty of postdocs to take their place. Remember that the length of postdoc positions has been increasing for decades, and it is especially bad for astrophysics - it isn't strange to hear of people spending 10 years in temporary positions! Combine this with the trend at universities to replace tenured professors with temporary lecturers and the pressure on those entering into the field is still going to be very high.

This shouldn't discourage you, it should just fit the theme I'm trying to lay out for you. Go into this field if you are dedicated to it, and once in it be on your game. You need great grades, fantastic grad research and good references. Cultivate those things and things will go well. Don't and you'll pay a hefty price.
SuperStringboy
#22
Nov4-07, 10:50 PM
P: 75
Thanks locrian for a nice post.And thanks for encouraging me.
But how much is the salary in the temporary positions like lecturer in universities? is it very poor?
TMFKAN64
#23
Nov5-07, 12:11 AM
P: 1,084
Quote Quote by SuperStringboy View Post
I have have a sell phone. ... I need two understand the equation.
I don't really mean to be critical here... it's clear that English is not your first language. But you need to be careful. Claiming to have a new theory after one year of studies and announcing it with errors like this does not scream "young genius". It screams "crank".

Quote Quote by SuperStringboy View Post
then i will have to do the job what einstein did.
You will have to get a Ph.D. through the normal route?
Asphodel
#24
Nov5-07, 12:22 AM
P: 451
Quote Quote by SuperStringboy View Post
But how much is the salary in the temporary positions like lecturer in universities? is it very poor?
Part-time faculty pay in the USA tends to be pretty bad. Pay for post-docs is likewise on the low side. Doing a post-doc as part-time faculty? The internet has a word for this, and the word is "LOL". P.T. Barnum would have preferred "sucker," which is a bit easier to use in conversation.
SuperStringboy
#25
Nov5-07, 01:21 AM
P: 75
Oh no i m not so dare to claim a new theory.Just a simple idea to change our vision to see nature.
I m also not dare to claim myself a genius.
And with einstein's job i mean that i will not get good job and i have be a clark like him.
Locrian
#26
Nov6-07, 10:42 AM
P: 1,745
Quote Quote by SuperStringboy View Post
And with einstein's job i mean that i will not get good job and i have be a clark like him.
What's wrong with working for the patent office? Be careful, what the public knows about Einstein is more myth than reality.

When Einstein formulated special relativity he had (what today would be) a masters in physics, he had a group of scientists he met and consulted with regularly, and his work at the patent office dealt with electromagnetism and light. This public perception that he was a rogue-hermit who produced a new theory while working as a secretary is nonsense.

If you want to "be like Einstein" you'll start by getting a solid education, and continue by consulting with established scientists (including reading published literature) while working in the area you are studying. It's not all that unlike a university job.
mgb_phys
#27
Nov6-07, 01:53 PM
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Quote Quote by Locrian View Post
That's unusual, in general. Most companies look for PE (or near PE) engineers to fill positions, largely for legal reasons. Certainly a fair number of physicists work as engineers, but the vast majority of engineering jobs are not open to them.
That's mainly true in civil engineering. A lot of hitech industry now crosses so many boundaries that the traditional separate engineering institues don't really apply. On a single project I might do software, electronics, mechanical and control system engineering - but I can do that because I'm a physicist!

I would say that doing physics opens more doors than engineering.
Irconically my first job after leaving astronomy fro a Biotech startup involved finding bright spots of fluorescent protein on a black background in CCD images!
Locrian
#28
Nov6-07, 03:00 PM
P: 1,745
Quote Quote by mgb_phys View Post
That's mainly true in civil engineering.
It is also true in much of materials, metallurgical engineering - and some mechanical engineering. EE I know less about; things could be different there.

That's funny about the spots on the CCD images!
mgb_phys
#29
Nov6-07, 03:24 PM
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Quote Quote by Locrian View Post
It is also true in much of materials, metallurgical engineering - and some mechanical engineering. EE I know less about; things could be different there.
With products the item is certified by external bodies (CE etc) and it doesn't matter who designed it.

That's funny about the spots on the CCD images!
The investors loved it - using Nasa technology from the Space Telescope ( SAOimage + IRAF)
suarez7
#30
Jul5-11, 08:32 AM
P: 1
I am interested to know what type of career you can get in engineering from an astrophyics degree. For instance I know a professor teaching physics in Electronic and Electrical Engineering, and he comes from a nanotechnology background. So what could you gain from astrophysics?
twofish-quant
#31
Jul5-11, 11:29 PM
P: 6,863
Quote Quote by SuperStringboy View Post
In a article of Mishio kaku he said that now there is a job problem because of old scientists who are called the sputnic group or something like that. In few years they will start to retire.
They've been saying that for the last thirty years.

One good/bad thing about physics is that you can do it for a very long time. I know 80-year old theoretical physicists that are still publishing good work. So physicists don't retire.
twofish-quant
#32
Jul5-11, 11:31 PM
P: 6,863
Quote Quote by Locrian View Post
If you want to "be like Einstein" you'll start by getting a solid education, and continue by consulting with established scientists (including reading published literature) while working in the area you are studying. It's not all that unlike a university job.
Also the important thing about Einstein's job (and I think there is this letter which he actually mentions this) is that it was an 8 hour job. The 40 hour work week died years ago.
tiffanydione
#33
Jul6-11, 06:45 PM
P: 4
I have a degree in Astrophysics. I LOVED my studies and wouldn't have studied anything else!!!! I studied what I LOVE and my passion!! I've had many interviews just because of my degree. Some people just want to interview you because they've never met anybody with an Astrophysics degree, LOL. TRUE!! I say GO GET IT!!! STUDY WHAT YOU LOVE!!! Good luck and give 'em hell!!!!
Functor97
#34
Jul6-11, 10:43 PM
P: 209
Its never risky to do what you love!
leontd
#35
Jul14-11, 04:07 AM
P: 16
Like others have said the field is certainly small, and the chance of getting a adequate position in that industry is adversely difficult. It also varies on your background.. make sure to graduate at least top 10% in your class, it will significantly improve your chances.
Chronos
#36
Jul14-11, 04:17 AM
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P: 9,488
Yep, makes a good launch pad for engineering work. I'm still a closet cosmologist though. PE licenses are not much in demand aside from civil engineering.


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