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Synesthesia, some people perceive individual symbols, characters, numbers

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zoobyshoe
#37
Apr13-10, 08:12 AM
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Quote Quote by rhody View Post
To comment to your last statement, to be fair I haven't finished it yet, and there may be other extenuating circumstances. For now according to Dr Stump's and Dr Cytowic's findings the blood flow in the cereberal cortex is vastly reduced (abnormally so) at rest and even more so during stimulation which gives rise to more active response in the limbic area, that I said could not be measured with the CBF test at the time. I have to believe that up to date technology could do a better job on all fronts. I will do some research to see if more modern tests have been performed.
I'll let you finish your research. So far the list of pertinent information you culled from the book looks excellent.
Frame Dragger
#38
Apr13-10, 09:20 AM
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Rhody, that was actually quite cheering to read, and Zooby already hit the high notes there. You've taken a very complex subject and dissected it nicely given that you're mid-stream! I would add one element, but not a correction: All of this illustrates the plasticity of the human brain (especially in the very young), and the relativity of perception, but also that imaging has limits not just based on the technology, but what it is a researcher is looking for.
StarkRG
#39
Apr13-10, 03:13 PM
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rhody, zoobyshoe: I seem to recall that it was taste and sight. In other words letters, numbers, shapes, and other symbols can not only have color but a flavor too.

Then again, maybe I was thinking of quarks...
Frame Dragger
#40
Apr13-10, 03:30 PM
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Quote Quote by StarkRG View Post
rhody, zoobyshoe: I seem to recall that it was taste and sight. In other words letters, numbers, shapes, and other symbols can not only have color but a flavor too.

Then again, maybe I was thinking of quarks...
I can settle this: it's Grapheme -> Colour which is most common, or believed to be.

http://www.bu.edu/synesthesia/faq/index.html

HOWEVER... that is most commonly reported, discovered, etc. That may be due to the primary role of vision in humans. In other words, there may be a major sampling (and other) biases.
StarkRG
#41
Apr13-10, 03:43 PM
P: 15
Ooh, I dunno if I'd say vision is primary unless you're talking about what we notice consciously. Smell has a much more direct connection with memories (sound too, but less so). The difference is that it smell is a little more subconscious than sight.
Frame Dragger
#42
Apr13-10, 03:49 PM
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Quote Quote by StarkRG View Post
Ooh, I dunno if I'd say vision is primary unless you're talking about what we notice consciously. Smell has a much more direct connection with memories (sound too, but less so). The difference is that it smell is a little more subconscious than sight.
This isn't one of those "maybes". Human beings are sight-primary, compared to saaaay, dogs, which primarily rely on scentt. This isn't to say we can't smell, but we do not navigate our world by it. As for the memories, scent-memory is there, but limited, and visual cues are FAR more effective than auditory cues in humans.

Compared to most other mammals we have VERY acute vision, and very poor hearing and sense of smell. The connection to memory is not relelvant to sight's primacy.
waht
#43
Apr13-10, 04:24 PM
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An interesting short clip on synesthesia. The subject's favorite dish is chicken with ice-cream because it looks good literally.

Frame Dragger
#44
Apr13-10, 04:37 PM
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*throws up a little* Yes, that is truly intersting, but um... BLEGH!
waht
#45
Apr13-10, 04:54 PM
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Quote Quote by Frame Dragger View Post
*throws up a little* Yes, that is truly intersting, but um... BLEGH!
Gives a whole new meaning of synesthesia as a "gift."
Frame Dragger
#46
Apr13-10, 05:08 PM
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Quote Quote by waht View Post
Gives a whole new meaning of synesthesia as a "gift."
Oh yeah, the one that keeps on giving and leaves a funny taste in your mouth. That said, objectively, he enjoys the chicken and ice-cream so... who am I to judge? That said... I am going to have a very LIGHT dinner with this in mind.
rhody
#47
Apr13-10, 06:35 PM
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Quote Quote by waht View Post
An interesting short clip on synesthesia. The subject's favorite dish is chicken with ice-cream because it looks good literally.
waht,

I know the video was a short one, I wonder if Dr Eagleman is aware of those who blazed the trail before him, in this case Dr Cytowic, who not only tested the patients in his book, but ran the CBF tests (and others I haven't reported on yet) to determine where it occurs in the brain.

Second, if you look at item 15 in my list, and you are of drinking age and do drink and wouldn't mind answering the question, does alcohol enhance the effects of the condition, do the sensations become more vivid, intense, etc... Only answer if you are comfortable with the question, I don't want to pressure you in any way.

Third, reading more of the book today, the test subject whose blood flow was vastly reduced did not have any underlying condition that could have caused it, no lesions, cancer etc... I hope this puts your mind at ease at bit.

Thanks...

Rhody...
waht
#48
Apr13-10, 09:32 PM
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Quote Quote by rhody View Post
I know the video was a short one, I wonder if Dr Eagleman is aware of those who blazed the trail before him, in this case Dr Cytowic, who not only tested the patients in his book, but ran the CBF tests (and others I haven't reported on yet) to determine where it occurs in the brain.
He's a researcher so I suppose he must have studied everything on the subject.

Second, if you look at item 15 in my list, and you are of drinking age and do drink and wouldn't mind answering the question, does alcohol enhance the effects of the condition, do the sensations become more vivid, intense, etc... Only answer if you are comfortable with the question, I don't want to pressure you in any way.
No pressure taken. But to answer your question, I really don't know what the effects of alcohol had been because I never thought about observing this behavior under the influence, and also most of it is hard to recall

Third, reading more of the book today, the test subject whose blood flow was vastly reduced did not have any underlying condition that could have caused it, no lesions, cancer etc... I hope this puts your mind at ease at bit.

It's pretty fascinating. Needless to say, I'll pick up this book sometime this week.
fuzzyfelt
#49
Apr14-10, 06:16 AM
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Cytowic and Eagleman co-authored "Wednesday Is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia".
rhody
#50
Apr14-10, 08:32 AM
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A good collection of synesthasia links here including Cytowic's personal website: scroll down, under: Synaesthesia researchers heading.

Don't have a chance to browse any of them (in detail) now. For review and comment if you wish. Info supplied here pretty much indicates, at least to me, that this thread has plenty of life in it, even after review of Cytowic's book.

Rhody...
khz
#51
Apr15-10, 12:45 PM
P: 16
Sorry for deviating from wherever the discussion has led to, but I have voluntary synesthesia resulting from one time marijuana use. That is, I can turn off the lights whilst listening to music, and I can have mild visual pattern/colour correlative hallucinations that conform to any changes to the music. It's AWESOME! I'm not scared of psychosis or anything because I just see it as my visual cortex getting too much electricity or blood or whatever resulting from my expectation of mild hallucinations to start (remember, it's totally voluntary). I'm curious as to how this was 'unlocked' in me though.
Frame Dragger
#52
Apr15-10, 12:57 PM
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Quote Quote by khz View Post
Sorry for deviating from wherever the discussion has led to, but I have voluntary synesthesia resulting from one time marijuana use. That is, I can turn off the lights whilst listening to music, and I can have mild visual pattern/colour correlative hallucinations that conform to any changes to the music. It's AWESOME! I'm not scared of psychosis or anything because I just see it as my visual cortex getting too much electricity or blood or whatever resulting from my expectation of mild hallucinations to start (remember, it's totally voluntary). I'm curious as to how this was 'unlocked' in me though.
Marijuana has been shown to trigger mental illness that might otherwise have remained dormant... and while Synesthesia isn't a mental illness, I wonder if a similar mechanism could be at play. More likely this is a very unusual effect that frankly, I can't even begin to explain. Synesthesia DURING drug use is not unheard of, but to become Synesthetic... I think that is. Beyond that... *baffled*
rhody
#53
Apr15-10, 01:01 PM
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Quote Quote by khz View Post
I'm curious as to how this weas 'unlocked' though.
khz,

Me too, I would say to start that you may have been on the threshold for it to happen to begin with, and the one time use of whacky weed that triggered it. They say it can run in families so check and see if other relatives have experienced it too. I am sure if you "google" on it you will find others like yourself and what effects they now experience because of it. I am no Dr, but it may be something else that sounds like synesthesia and you are putting the "synesthesia" label on it. Are the symptoms always the same, consistent or do they change in intensity and in the sensations you are experiencing ?

Do some more probing on your own and let us know what you discover.

Rhody...
khz
#54
Apr15-10, 01:11 PM
P: 16
Quote Quote by rhody View Post
khz,

Me too, I would say to start that you may have been on the threshold for it to happen to begin with, and the one time use of whacky weed that triggered it. They say it can run in families so check and see if other relatives have experienced it too. I am sure if you "google" on it you will find others like yourself and what effects they now experience because of it. I am no Dr, but it may be something else that sounds like synesthesia and you are putting the "synesthesia" label on it. Are the symptoms always the same, consistent or do they change in intensity and in the sensations you are experiencing ?

Do some more probing on your own and let us know what you discover.

Rhody...
No filial history of mental illness, otherwise I wouldn't have tried it. Looking back, I regret trying marijuana as LSD seems much healthier for the brain. (note: onlyh done weed, and only once) It is foremost voluntary visuals whilst in a dark room, brought on by consciously remembering the hallucinatory experience. The introduction of music produces the seeing of the music, that materialises as changing visuals when the music changes. The whole thing started about 1 month after the weed experience. I was sitting in a train and for 30 minutes was remembering my experience. Suddenly something got unlocked, and I was having visuals of a twisting double helix, and I felt that I could morph this into whatever visual I wanted at will. I wonder whether remembering the experience tricked my brain into doing something that it did in the experience.

Now, I can only ever get visuals when I'm in the dark. I bring it on consciously and it goes away consciously. I do it for fun quite a lot. The visuals are always centred in the middle of wherever I'm looking at (I can't look away from the visuals). This is obviously because it's in my brain and not reliant on photons coming into my eyes. I can induce all sorts of visuals, which I will describe to everyone if there is demand for the information.

EDIT: Actually, to say I've done weed once is an error on my part. I did it one more time when I was on holiday with friends. Except, this yielded no hallucinations (This was post-involuntary hallucinations period).


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