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Where is the center of the universe?

by JediSouth
Tags: universe
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Quantum-lept
#73
Jul10-10, 03:30 PM
P: 50
Fredrik, I did not know..that is why i asked the questions...you know the math, you know your theory, it's history, strengths and weakness, i don't.

I have to take it on faith, and i don't do faith well.

If Darwin and others point out what will falsify their theory, then i assumed that every theory has an argument or evidence that will falsify it. Has nothing to do with what others believe or think if they can support their theories and those theories are not falsified.

I thought that is what science is, postulating a theory and trying to falsify it.

I only have theories based on what i observe and understand. These can be easily falsified because observation without specific knowledge is prone to error.

So, if there are no questionable variables in your mathematical models which no one has taken issue with, then it is a sound working theory and obviously beyond my understanding. I can only try.

And the center of the universe is not me..(:
Fredrik
#74
Jul10-10, 04:16 PM
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Quote Quote by Quantum-lept View Post
I thought that is what science is, postulating a theory and trying to falsify it.
It is, but you must have lost track of what we were talking about very early in this exchange. I said that physicists who use the phrase "the edge of the universe" are probably talking about the most distant things we can see, and you questioned that with some very confusing comments. I see now that you at some point must have started talking about something completely different. I still don't know what.
Chronos
#75
Jul11-10, 01:45 AM
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Ok, back to the original question, in case we lost track of that. We are at the temporal edge of the universe and the rest of it looks very smooth. Does that mean we reside at the center of the universe?
Quantum-lept
#76
Jul13-10, 03:48 PM
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Quote Quote by Chronos View Post
Ok, back to the original question, in case we lost track of that. We are at the temporal edge of the universe and the rest of it looks very smooth. Does that mean we reside at the center of the universe?
I'm questioning the mathematical models that come to conclusions that may at this time observably may be confirmed, but since there is still so much that we don't observe, require some faith to believe.

What if we observe that the universe goes back 100bly?
That would make the universe much, much older than we think it is now...If some mathematical model says it is 14bly, then observation or the model is in error.

There may not ever be a way to confirm if there is an edge to the universe other than a mathematical model, so that has to be tested and questioned and if a weakness is found, suspected as flawed beyond a certain point.

I just read that "singularities" are a problem...I have a problem with them too...The BB makes a ripping good yarn, gives people something to think about and have faith in, but singularities may be an invention because we can't see mathematically into the area that we are looking toward.

Another problem: Too many infinities...infinity this, infinity that...infinities piled into, onto, or otherwise associated with infinities...the universe may not be infinite. time may not be infinite..infinite mass, just a glitch in the math.

To say for certain that there is or is not an edge to a universe requires faith, or faith based science...for now, anyway.
petm1
#77
Jul14-10, 03:03 PM
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We are at the temporal edge of the universe and the rest of it looks very smooth. Does that mean we reside at the center of the universe?
Yes when you think of visible universe, but no because the center is relative to each of us through our own center connection in time and not through space. In some ways time appears to be the boundary condition for all waves to a point.


Too many infinities...infinity this, infinity that...infinities piled into, onto, or otherwise associated with infinities...the universe may not be infinite. time may not be infinite..infinite mass, just a glitch in the math
Good thing we can keep it to finite numbers because we are seeing motion relative to each of us in time not just space.
JediSouth
#78
Jul28-10, 05:10 PM
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Quote Quote by Chronos View Post
Yes, that is what Halls of Ivy is saying, and I agree.
Yes, but WHERE IS THE STARTING POINT that everything starting moving away from
Chronos
#79
Jul28-10, 11:07 PM
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Everywhere is the short answer. Since everything began at the initial 'singularity', every atom in the universe still thinks it is at the center.
EinsteinII
#80
Aug4-10, 12:05 PM
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Quote Quote by russ_watters View Post
Welcome to PF. Imagine sitting on a high mountain. Turn around in every direction - in every direction, the earth looks roughly the same. This is a good 2d analogy for the 3d space.

Everywhere we look in space, it looks about the same. This implies rather strongly that there is no center to the universe. And expansion need not require one: replace the Earth with a giant balloon, expanding, and the analogy still holds.
I need one more explanation. I think by this question our friend wants to know the location of Big Bang.. If that.. Do we have any clues as of now?
petm1
#81
Aug4-10, 12:14 PM
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Everywhere is the short answer. Since everything began at the initial 'singularity', every atom in the universe still thinks it is at the center.
We see the atoms as separate pieces of this single event as for distance just think of redshift as a measure of time's dilation not just space's expansion after all relative they are one.
Radrook
#82
Aug17-10, 08:03 PM
P: 334
Let's assume that our universe is one of the theoretical millions that are like soap bubbles in a vast endless sea. If so then it is finite. If finite that means it has a periphery. If it has a periphery then the distance from its peripheries inward until we achieve radius would give us its approximate center.

Multiverse Theory
http://www.makli.com/multiverse-theory-008210/
Chronos
#83
Aug17-10, 11:19 PM
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We are at the temporal edge of the universe. No matter what direction we look, the rest of the universe appears more ancient [due to the finite speed of light]. Since it looks the same in every direction, it creates the illusion we are at the center. The same is true for any other observer in the universe. The concepts of 'center' or 'edge' of the universe are therefore irrelevant.
Radrook
#84
Aug18-10, 11:12 AM
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Quote Quote by Chronos View Post
We are at the temporal edge of the universe. No matter what direction we look, the rest of the universe appears more ancient [due to the finite speed of light]. Since it looks the same in every direction, it creates the illusion we are at the center. The same is true for any other observer in the universe. The concepts of 'center' or 'edge' of the universe are therefore irrelevant.
But does perception relative to position make a center impossible? Isn't that like saying that perception makes reality? Also, how does irrelevancy make reality any different? Isn't that simply a dismissal of the presently unknowable? Neither does inability to comprehend change reality. It merely proves inability to comprehend. We may be fish in a vast sea which seemingly has no center but the sea might indeed have a center despite our inability to see or comprehend where it is. If we say that the universe was infinitely small and suddenly appeared and expanded, then we create paradoxes. That is a fact. But to say that every single point on that expanding universe was and still is at its center, or that it was and is impossible for it to have a center is to postulate the impossible. If indeed it is impossible for our universe to have a center even though it is acknowledged to be finite then the reason why it i impossible has to be proven. Despite my extensive reading on the subject I have as yet not encountered a convincing or even an attempted explanation proving this supposed impossibility.
Chronos
#85
Aug19-10, 03:18 AM
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Do you agree every observer in the universe perceives they are as far away as possible from the 'center' of the 'big bang', 'now'? [given the finite speed of light]?
Radrook
#86
Aug19-10, 04:57 PM
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Quote Quote by Chronos View Post
Do you agree every observer in the universe perceives they are as far away as possible from the 'center' of the 'big bang', 'now'? [given the finite speed of light]?

I agree that every observer sees the universe receding from his position. That doesn't justify the observer to conclude he holds the universal central position. It only proves that from his perspective it seems as if he does. Neither does it prove there is no central position. If indeed the relativity of perspective justifies concluding that no central position is possible then please explain how.
Chronos
#87
Aug20-10, 12:37 AM
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Science is derived from observation. If it appears you are at the center of the universe, you must derive an experiment that attempts to disprove this theory. Lacking any such evidence means either you are at the center, or no center exists. We can say with fair certainty we are at the temporal edge of the universe, yet we observe the same distribution of galaxies [at large scales] in every direction. That too is compelling evidence the notion of any 'edge' to the universe is an illusion. An unbounded region has no 'center' according to the rules of geometry.
DLuckyE
#88
Aug20-10, 02:14 AM
P: 44
Quote Quote by Chronos View Post
Science is derived from observation. If it appears you are at the center of the universe, you must derive an experiment that attempts to disprove this theory. Lacking any such evidence means either you are at the center, or no center exists. We can say with fair certainty we are at the temporal edge of the universe, yet we observe the same distribution of galaxies [at large scales] in every direction. That too is compelling evidence the notion of any 'edge' to the universe is an illusion. An unbounded region has no 'center' according to the rules of geometry.

So basically, you're saying if i'm drifting somewhere in a big ocean and can see the distance of water to the horizon is equal in every direction I have to conclude that i'm either at the center of that there's no center to the ocean at all? That makes no sense at all... It just means that the ocean is bigger than your horizon and thus you can't determine if there's a center and if you're at that center.
petm1
#89
Aug20-10, 12:16 PM
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Quote Quote by Chronos View Post
Science is derived from observation. If it appears you are at the center of the universe, you must derive an experiment that attempts to disprove this theory. Lacking any such evidence means either you are at the center, or no center exists. We can say with fair certainty we are at the temporal edge of the universe, yet we observe the same distribution of galaxies [at large scales] in every direction. That too is compelling evidence the notion of any 'edge' to the universe is an illusion. An unbounded region has no 'center' according to the rules of geometry.
Unbounded may be what we "see", but bounded is what we feel. We are bounded by gravity which is a true center connection and the center of gravity is a real direction in time. Relative to my "now" the path back through time is inward opposite of the flow set into each atom. I "think" big bang was a little twist, a focal point of motion, because it formed our atoms, like a little focal point that broke into all of our dilating massive points. Time does not contract it is still dilating outward from big bang, and even though relative to my now I do not know where its center is in space, I "think" time's center was big bang the original dilating entity.
bytecash
#90
Jan7-12, 06:29 PM
P: 1
This still does not make sense, there HAS to be a "center" of the Universe under the big bang theory, even if it is a ball or balloon blowing up, there is still a CENTER or middle of the ball or balloon. Even if there are no "edges" of the universe there is still a geometrical point of center. If the universe started from one point in space and expanded in all directions there is a center even if it is a moving central point.


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