Are protons magnetic?


by Kalrag
Tags: attracted, controlled, magnet, protons
Kalrag
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#1
Oct1-10, 11:05 PM
P: 100
Alright, this one is really bugging me. Are protons magnetic. Are they attracted to a magnet or can the be controlled by a magnet?
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cragar
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#2
Oct2-10, 01:03 AM
P: 2,453
They have a Magnetic moment and so do neutrons .
Idoubt
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#3
Oct2-10, 01:10 AM
P: 162
yes they can be controlled magnetically, that's how particle accelerators work.

Kalrag
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#4
Oct2-10, 09:50 AM
P: 100

Are protons magnetic?


So is that also true for neutrons. That they can be controlled by magnets?
DaleSpam
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#5
Oct2-10, 01:02 PM
Mentor
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Quote Quote by Idoubt View Post
yes they can be controlled magnetically, that's how particle accelerators work.
That is also how magnetic resonance imaging works.
cragar
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#6
Oct2-10, 02:34 PM
P: 2,453
Quote Quote by Kalrag View Post
So is that also true for neutrons. That they can be controlled by magnets?
Yes but their B field is very weak.
Sakha
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#7
Oct2-10, 08:55 PM
P: 295
Quote Quote by Kalrag View Post
Alright, this one is really bugging me. Are protons magnetic. Are they attracted to a magnet or can the be controlled by a magnet?
Just to clear a point: a magnetic field will not do work on the proton. It will accelerate the proton in a circular way, just changing the direction but not the magnitude.
JDługosz
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#8
Oct4-10, 05:15 PM
P: 346
Individual protons are magnetic in the same sense as individual electrons! They are both charged spin-1/2 particles.
granpa
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#9
Oct4-10, 05:43 PM
P: 2,258
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-factor

electron fudge factor
proton and neutron fudge factor
muon fudge factor
JDługosz
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#10
Oct6-10, 05:03 PM
P: 346
Quote Quote by granpa View Post
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-factor

electron fudge factor...
Other than being more massive, can you explain what the differences are? How does this affect its motion, in contrast to (just) its mass and charge?
granpa
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#11
Oct6-10, 06:44 PM
P: 2,258
We would expect magnetic moment and angular momentum to always be proportional to each other.
They arent.
Hence the fudge factors.
K^2
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#12
Oct7-10, 12:14 AM
Sci Advisor
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Quote Quote by Sakha View Post
Just to clear a point: a magnetic field will not do work on the proton. It will accelerate the proton in a circular way, just changing the direction but not the magnitude.
What you said is true for CONSTANT magnetic field. A gradient in the field can accelerate a magnetic moment.
QuantumPion
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#13
Oct7-10, 11:43 AM
P: 733
Quote Quote by Idoubt View Post
yes they can be controlled magnetically, that's how particle accelerators work.
This doesn't sound right to me. Particle accelerators use magnetic fields to curve the path of protons but this is due to the proton's electric charge moving through an external magnetic field, not the proton's magnetic moment.


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