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Quatron quad pixel technology - From Sharp

by Ivan Seeking
Tags: pixel, quad, quatron, sharp, technology
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Moonbear
#19
Apr6-10, 06:37 PM
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Quote Quote by mgb_phys View Post
ie it can't display them without some new dyes on the screen.
Isn't that the point of this product? It's adding a new "dye"?

Your eyes also respond differently looking down a microscope to what you see on a monitor in a brightly lit lab.
I'm aware of that, but I don't view the monitor in a brightly lit lab. When I'm working with images, I do so in a dimly lit room to better see what's on the screen.

Of course, it may also have to do with the detector rather than the monitor.

I don't know if this technology really makes a difference or not, I'm just commenting that I can envision the possibility. It's useless to look at videos using my current monitor to determine the quality of the product this ad claims. I'd have to go to someplace where the display was being sold and see it for myself to know if I could see an improvement or not.
pallidin
#20
Apr6-10, 07:34 PM
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Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
I'd have to go to someplace where the display was being sold and see it for myself to know if I could see an improvement or not.
Ditto. The general tech makes sense, but the proof is in the viewing using the actual displays.
Frame Dragger
#21
Apr26-10, 12:01 PM
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This is interesting, but I find advnaces in power consumption and B&W contrast far more interesting in the LCD side of things. After all, sharpening the yellow is really nothing more than a juke to the side from the issue of not producing a true greyscale to black. Now, something like 3Qi's screen tech is far more interesting, and practical.
mugaliens
#22
Sep3-10, 06:05 PM
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Why not six colors? They fit quite well in hexagonal patterns.. :)

My printer has six colors/cartridges...
pallidin
#23
Sep3-10, 06:20 PM
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Quote Quote by mugaliens View Post
Why not six colors? They fit quite well in hexagonal patterns.. :)

My printer has six colors/cartridges...
True, but why not then go for it all: 16,777,216 for 24-bit true color? Just kidding!

As you increase the color array, you also increase its size. This could easily cause annoying pixelation.
Or, if you reduce the pixel size to compensate for increase in array size, you could loose luminosity.
Advances in technology will of course address both issue a little at a time.
mugaliens
#24
Sep4-10, 05:29 AM
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Quote Quote by pallidin View Post
True, but why not then go for it all: 16,777,216 for 24-bit true color? Just kidding!
Yah, ha, lol...

As you increase the color array, you also increase its size.
Yet with both printer heads and LEDs, as the pixel size has continued to decrease, the color array has also decreased, to the point where my photographic printer spits out 8x10s which rival that of 25 ASA film from the sixty's.

I think 25 ASA. Might be 25 DIN. All I know is that it's far more sharp, and rich, than any 8x10 print from that era.

I also do much large reproductions from my 8 mp camera. These cost much more, around $45, but when I do them right (interpixellating the image and performing similar color corrections before output), they fetch some decent prices ($300) for that $45.

Then again, I'm a very good photographer, so I capture what people want. That's the difference.

This could easily cause annoying pixelation.
Or, if you reduce the pixel size to compensate for increase in array size, you could loose luminosity.
Advances in technology will of course address both issue a little at a time.[/QUOTE]
mugaliens
#25
Sep4-10, 05:50 AM
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Bottom line, I think things will ultimately find their way to a six pixel "illuminon," along with a small enough pattern that no one will be able to discern at a distance of 24 inches or more.

Why do I think this? Because at this limit, we have arrived!

Oh, yes, there are both black and white limites (the technical terms) as well as the "contrast ratios" (the marketing terms).

Just beware the difference between the technical terms and the marketing terms...
FlexGunship
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Sep13-10, 10:07 AM
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Quote Quote by mugaliens View Post
Why not six colors? They fit quite well in hexagonal patterns.. :)

My printer has six colors/cartridges...
Just give Gillette a few months and they'll come out with a TV that has five. Schick will follow with one that has six. Then Gillette will add a pixel color to the back of the screen for watching very small shows.
Mech_Engineer
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Dec9-10, 03:50 PM
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For what it's worth, MaximumPC has a "debunking" of Sharp's Quattron tech:

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/fea...specs?page=0,4

Quote Quote by MaximumPC.com
HDTV television and movie content is produced and color-balanced on three-color displays that are accurately calibrated to Rec.709. Sharpís fourth primary color is yellow, and there isnít anything for it to do because yellow is already being accurately reproduced with mixtures of the existing red and green primaries. More importantly, a Quattron display canít show colors that arenít in the original three-color source image. So what good is it? None, unless you like to see over-exaggerated yellows.


Quote Quote by MaximumPC.com
Note that in our figure, the outer white curve represents the limits of human vision
...
Sharpís yellow primary would need to lie somewhere outside of the red and green leg of the color triangle. But there isnít much room between the Rec.709 triangle and the human vision curve, is there? For this reason, itís difficult to see why a yellow primary sub-pixel is needed unless Sharp isnít able to put its red and green primaries where they belong.
FlexGunship
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Dec9-10, 04:54 PM
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Quote Quote by FlexGunship View Post
Just give Gillette a few months and they'll come out with a TV that has five. Schick will follow with one that has six. Then Gillette will add a pixel color to the back of the screen for watching very small shows.
Oh man. I forgot I wrote this. I read it, and was like "LMAO, who the hell wrote that?" And it was Flex! I'm losing my freakin' mind.

EDIT: By the way, I do some work in the printing industry, and additional colors outside of CMYK are only useful in subtractive coloring (i.e. mixing ink or paint), but not in additive coloring (i.e. light).

http://www.printingforless.com/color.html
christopherV
#29
Dec10-10, 04:50 AM
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Quote Quote by Ivan Seeking View Post



http://www.lcdtvbuyingguide.com/hdtv...quadcolor.html

A Gimmick, overreaching, or the new standard?
huge gimmick!!!

The problem would be in the recording medium...
The a professional video camera has 3 chips for recording color (RGB) which has the highest sensitivity to green to produce a response more like the human eye. (thats why professionals prefer green screens with video, there is more information on the green channel and it produces a clearer matte).

So if the camera is not recording the yellow channel then the TV must calculate the yellow channel from the available information (RGB) and I wouldn't expect there to be a huge difference until Panavision or another major camera manufacturer begins producing professional 4CCD camera.

film on the other hand has much greater color depth then digital; especially in the 4K range (for theatrical release) and you could see improvements there, however most films are processed and edited digitally, and the digital capture process relies on a 3CCD system.

I think it will go the way of beta-max.
Mech_Engineer
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Dec10-10, 10:23 PM
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Few people know, but the technology has already gone the way of the Dodo once... Panasonic tried it in tube TV's

Mech_Engineer
#31
Dec10-10, 10:44 PM
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Here's an interesting review for a European model of the Quattron, notice the calibration test:


http://www.flatpanelshd.com/review.p...&id=1287569264

...and a quote from AVSForum regarding the review linked:

Quote Quote by BobearQSI at AVSForum
The review measures delta E, which is deviation from the correct color. A value greater than 2 is a visible deviation for the correct color. 4-5 means the color is wrong. After the best calibration of the Sharp, the values are still mostly greater than 6. The yellow value is almost 8! This means if you put a calibrated Quattron next to a TV showing the correct yellow, you will easily see a difference in the color. And that's calibrated. The uncalibrated out-of-the-box chart was greater than 10, off the chart.
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...1237271&page=6
pallidin
#32
Dec11-10, 06:08 PM
P: 2,292
Wow. Nice find on that TV pic. I had no idea.
Maxô
#33
Dec21-10, 09:23 AM
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Mr. Stomatopod laughs at your pitiful visual capabilities!



http://arthropoda.files.wordpress.co...-vs-mantis.jpg
Albern
#34
Mar16-11, 07:12 AM
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Hi everyone,,
I see this video,,, It is really amazing and give a lot of information...
SO i recommended to see this video...
nismaratwork
#35
Mar16-11, 12:33 PM
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Quote Quote by Albern View Post
Hi everyone,,
I see this video,,, It is really amazing and give a lot of information...
SO i recommended to see this video...
What video?
FlexGunship
#36
Mar16-11, 12:39 PM
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Quote Quote by nismaratwork View Post
What video?
You know... just whatever video... really any video will do.


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