Lactose intolerance


by nucleargirl
Tags: intolerance, lactose
missmariss
missmariss is offline
#37
Sep22-10, 03:52 PM
P: 2
Quote Quote by nucleargirl View Post
No! I am going to defy my body and genetics!! I made my body intolerant, I WILL make it tolerant again!!! I'm gonna drink milk! all the time! see who's the boss!
Actually, this does have some merit to it.

While I wouldn't suggest starting off by drinking more dairy than you ever have before, it is true that the more lactose you consume, the more tolerant you become. Also, if you cut down on consumption of glucose, your body will more readily absorb lactose as an energy source.

To put it simply : there's something in your DNA called an operon, it has two functions.
One : if there is lactose present, it will trigger the production of the lactase enzyme
Two : if there is a lack of glucose, it will trigger the production of the lactase enzyme

So if you slowly introduce lactose back into your diet, as well as cut down on your intake of glucose, it's likely that you will redevelop a higher tolerance for lactose. That being said, people will milk allergies have been known to confuse this for lactose intolerance. ALLERGIES ARE NOT INTOLERANCE! Intolerance is the inability to digest something, we all have fiber intolerance, our stomachs are not designed to digest it so it moves on through us at a rapid rate. If you are allergic to milk it is usually the protein which makes you sick, and if you were to introduce more and more dairy into your diet you could become seriously ill.
nucleargirl
nucleargirl is offline
#38
Sep22-10, 04:01 PM
P: 126
ah no no, I am sure I am not allergic to milk cos I've been drinking my whole life with no problems until recently. I think my intolerance developed cos I cut out milk for 6 months, so now I'm trying to make my body used to having it around again.

um... I'm not so sure about the operon thing... I know its in bacteria, but I've not heard of it in humans...

thanks for the support tho! I know my body will see sense soon :)
missmariss
missmariss is offline
#39
Sep22-10, 05:57 PM
P: 2
Wow apparently I didn't understand that bio class as well as i should have haha!

You're absolutely right, it is in bacterial dna, not human. Is it possible though that one of these types of bacteria is one of the kinds found in our stomachs?
nucleargirl
nucleargirl is offline
#40
Sep23-10, 03:51 AM
P: 126
Quote Quote by missmariss View Post
Wow apparently I didn't understand that bio class as well as i should have haha!

You're absolutely right, it is in bacterial dna, not human. Is it possible though that one of these types of bacteria is one of the kinds found in our stomachs?
yeah! that is possible actually! its e.coli! maybe there's a kind thats already in our guts and not givng us food poisoning... wow! this is well cool! if we could somehow modify this bacteria to produce more lactase... either modify existing bacteria or make a new harmless type and make it into a pill... I think there's money in this!
mugaliens
mugaliens is offline
#41
Oct8-10, 01:23 AM
P: 594
Here's an interesting graphic showing lactose intolerance by geographic and ethnic groups. It ranges between 0.3% for Basques and 100% for Native Americans. I find that last one interesting, as the five runners-up are all Asiatic.
nucleargirl
nucleargirl is offline
#42
Oct23-10, 12:44 PM
P: 126
Alright! Update: so its been a month since I started the experiment :) during which I have pretty much eaten some milk product every day, and now.... I feel much better!!
Yesterday I had 2 cups of chocolate milk and had cereal for breakfast, and I didnt have very much bloating and gas at all! I'd say a lot less than before. And today I had a huge bowl of rice pudding for lunch and I feel good right now! had a little gas in the afternoon but nothing out of the ordinary! lol
who knows! maybe its working, or maybe I am just getting really tolerant of myself....
we'll see! more updates later!
Borek
Borek is online now
#43
Oct23-10, 01:22 PM
Admin
Borek's Avatar
P: 22,679
Thank you for the information. While I am not really interested in the information about your gases I appreciate fact that you remembered to post an update, it doesn't happen too often - most people just disappear without traces.

Could be others just explode, leaving traces all over, but not on the forum.
nucleargirl
nucleargirl is offline
#44
Oct23-10, 03:00 PM
P: 126
You're welcome Borek! I enjoy these updates too much to forget!
lisab
lisab is offline
#45
Oct23-10, 03:06 PM
Mentor
lisab's Avatar
P: 2,915
Wow, I must admit, I'm surprised at the outcome of your experiment. I thought for sure you'd be in too much discomfort, and have to give up.

I'm happy for you !
nucleargirl
nucleargirl is offline
#46
Oct23-10, 03:13 PM
P: 126
:) thanks Lisa!
Evo
Evo is offline
#47
Oct23-10, 03:27 PM
Mentor
Evo's Avatar
P: 25,940
Good going nucleargirl!!
bobze
bobze is offline
#48
Oct23-10, 04:20 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
P: 640
Lactase (the enzyme responsible for digesting lactose, a galactose/glucose disaccharide) is pretty unique because it is the only brush-border enzyme (that's the intestinal-cell/lumen border) kept in amounts near equivalent to "need".

The expression of lactase declines for most adults throughout life. However, your body can respond to the presence of lactose in the lumen by upregulating production of lactase (its a pretty convoluted regulatory pathway).

So for a significant portion of adults, ingesting lactose (milk sugar), even later in life can lead to more expression of lactase and thus better lactose digestive capabilities. In those adults that have difficulty digesting lactose, they lack the regulatory capabilities of those who can digest lactose.

Even if you continually eat lactose products throughout life, your digestive efficiency declines with age.

Sorry I didn't see this earlier, I could have saved you a month and some discomfort nucleargirl!


Edit: I'd like to correct my first sentence. Trehalase (for digesting trehalose, a sugar found exclusively in mushrooms) is also kept in low concentrations in the brush border as well. Other enzymes though, like sucrase-isomaltase are kept in excessive amounts ensuring complete digestion of those sugars to their monosaccharides.
Borek
Borek is online now
#49
Oct23-10, 04:38 PM
Admin
Borek's Avatar
P: 22,679
Quote Quote by bobze View Post
Sorry I didn't see this earlier, I could have saved you a month and some discomfort nucleargirl!
I think you have missed the point. She was aware of the potential problems and she decided to check if she can force "upregulation of production of lactase". Obviously it worked.
bobze
bobze is offline
#50
Oct23-10, 04:52 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
P: 640
Quote Quote by Borek View Post
I think you have missed the point. She was aware of the potential problems and she decided to check if she can force "upregulation of production of lactase". Obviously it worked.
Yes, like I pointed out. That's not new news (I believe most of this was worked out in the late 90's) Hence the save you a month and experiment
nucleargirl
nucleargirl is offline
#51
Oct24-10, 04:30 AM
P: 126
Yes, its going to be a long-term (if not life-long) experiment for me! I want to be able to eat milk without problems. I'm still young so not worried about digestive efficiency declining. Maybe experiment is the wrong word - its more like lifestyle change!
gascap
gascap is offline
#52
Feb9-11, 10:51 PM
P: 2
That is great for you. It did not work so well for me. My realization came when I was in my early 30s but nothing has helped to mitigate it. And just for the record there are certain things I have discovered are absolute no-nos Cream is one and CoolWhip is the other.
I will venture into a piece of pizza once in a while but I stay with lactiad capsules and lactose free milk or soy milk for comfort. The surprise was when I had some throat problems when eating a Salmon filet and later discovered that they are often coated with Casein, which is milk protein as I understand it.
Borek
Borek is online now
#53
Feb10-11, 03:18 AM
Admin
Borek's Avatar
P: 22,679
Quote Quote by gascap View Post
The surprise was when I had some throat problems when eating a Salmon filet and later discovered that they are often coated with Casein, which is milk protein as I understand it.
How is milk protein related to lactose intolerance? I can be missing something but I don't see a connection.
bobze
bobze is offline
#54
Feb10-11, 07:31 AM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
P: 640
Quote Quote by Borek View Post
How is milk protein related to lactose intolerance? I can be missing something but I don't see a connection.
Its not. Lactose intolerance is the result of not having enough lactase along the digestive epithelium (particularly in the jejunum). Lactase, is normally only kept in low amounts, so its easy for there to not be enough lactase to digest the lactose sugars.

If one were to consume too much lactose, the increase in a non-diffusable substrate changes the osmolar concentration of the lumen of the GI. This is what leads to diarrhea (osmotic diarrhea) and the other symptoms associated with lactose intolerance.

If you had a reaction to milk proteins (namely casein) you'd be having an allergic reaction to milk, not an intolerance to lactose (which is possible, though much more rare).


Register to reply

Related Discussions
equation for lactose --> glucose Biology, Chemistry & Other Homework 0
bio question...lactose intolerance Biology, Chemistry & Other Homework 7
lactase - lactose connection Biology 21
Some cell biology questions (cancer & lactose intolerance) Biology 6
lactose intolerance Biology 11