is time in essence - constant?


by trickae
Tags: constant, essence, time
Shackleford
Shackleford is offline
#37
May26-10, 04:27 PM
P: 1,537
Quote Quote by filegraphy View Post
Why can't time be constant? It moves regularly and is slowed by speed. Time allows movement, and movement slows time. Am I correct or have I made a mistake?
Well, it's only variable with respect to a moving inertial frame. An observer in an inertial frame at rest with respect to a clock experiences a constant rate of time, which incidentally is the maximum. I would observe a clock in a moving frame to be running at a "slower" rate of time, i.e. more time would elapse in my frame than in the moving frame. The word relativity is a really accurate term in describing such observed phenomena. lol. Einstein showed it's utterly useless to assign some sort of absolute solar, galactic, or universal standard of time since we would all experience, or rather observe, different rates of time depending on our relative inertial frames. I'm discovering that I think relativity is something I'd want to study more at the graduate level. I've been trying to figure out something in which to specialize beyond my undergrad.
filegraphy
filegraphy is offline
#38
May26-10, 05:24 PM
P: 93
Yeah that makes more sense now. Well put. Thanks.
TCS
TCS is offline
#39
May27-10, 06:13 AM
P: 85
What we perceive as time varies with energy density/velocity. However, our rate of time could just be a one dimensional projection of a multi-dimensional concept, where the magnitude of multi-dimensional time is constant.
King Wildog
King Wildog is offline
#40
Mar25-11, 09:56 PM
P: 6
First, hello, all! I hope I am at home here.

I, as well, firmly believe time is constant. Someone likened it unto a scale previously- and that is exactly what it is. Time only exists in that we have concieved it as a measuring scale for comparison of places or events. That is- it is a figment of our imagination. Perception of time is so easily confused with true time which is the duration of an event or object in its environment acted on by the sum of all vectors. --King Wildog
Scizyr
Scizyr is offline
#41
Mar28-13, 05:34 PM
P: 5
*performs thread necromancy ritual*

Quote Quote by King Wildog View Post
Perception of time is so easily confused with true time which is the duration of an event or object in its environment acted on by the sum of all vectors. --King Wildog
I disagree with your definition of "true time" because it uses the term duration which implies a perception of time. Don't worry I'm not calling you out, I am just using your post as the segue to my argument of the thread's topic.

All time is relative. There is no objective reference that we can point to and say it is how we can measure time as a constant. In effect it really doesn't exist.

How can we then be sure that anything we measure is accurate? Is the speed of light constant in a vacuum? You cannot accurately measure the speed of anything because speed is the measurement of distance traveled through time. Since we don't have accurate/constant time, we can't have accurate speed.

All equations involving time are thus negated.

SR becomes CR(Circular Relativity)

Am I missing something? Please tell me I'm wrong about this.


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